Post Thirty One. A Blog Post (Mainly) About My Blog – Looking Back & Looking Forward.

My blog was fairly quiet in 2018, with only eight posts. In comparison, I published fifteen posts in 2017, and eight posts in 2016, the first one being in August 2016. My reduced output has been a result of my worsened health and my various other commitments, which all contributed to the worsened health. The majority of 2018 was spent working on my PIP application and ESA renewal (disability benefits/social security), I also spent a lot of time going back and forth to my numerous hospital appointments – two Urology appointments, two Neurology appointments, one Gynaecology appointment, one CT scan, one MRI scan, a pre-op assessment and my Endometrial Ablation procedure. I’m hoping I’ll see fewer doctors this year, although it’s currently eight days in (to 2019) and I’ve already seen one consultant and had an ultrasound – I got to spend Christmas thinking I might have breast cancer – I don’t (phew), and I’m seeing another consultant in March – Gynaecology, again. I am hoping however that I’ll be a bit more prolific with my blog in 2019, I have so much I want to write about.

Stats

I’ve been thinking about what marks the success of my blog. It’s still a baby in the blogging world, when taking the numbers into account, but I take pleasure in seeing the number of people visiting my blog increasing steadily since I began it, from the hundreds to the thousands. I now have almost seven thousand readers, and almost twelve thousand views.

I also love to see how far reaching my blog has become. It seems completely unreal that there are people reading it all over the world. My blog is being read in sixty nine countries, that’s over one third of the world’s countries! See for yourselves!

Blog countries (2)
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Guatemala, Guernsey, Honduras, Hong Kong SAR China, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jersey, Kenya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States and Vietnam.

Feedback

While the stats do make me happy, what means the most to me, is the positive feedback, especially from the ME community. When other people with ME can identify with what I’ve written, when they tell me how accurately I am portraying the illness, when they find comfort in it, when they use it to help educate the people in their lives, it is beyond anything I expected. I am now going to shamelessly blow my own trumpet. Here is a small selection of some of the lovely feedback that I have received.

A comment on Facebook about Post Nineteen. Time For Unrest. 

“I think this is probably the best piece of writing on M.E. I have ever seen. Smiling through the tears. Thank you.”

Someone shared my blog in the Phoenix Rising forum.

“I’ve only just discovered this blog, though I imagine others here in PR will already know of it. Not read all of it by any means, but what I read is good… in the sense it conveys well how bad life can be with ME. And Phoebe, whose blog it is, conveys a good sense of her own self, and hence how ME impacts her, and from that how so many other people are impacted by ME.”

A conversation between two people on Twitter about Post Twenty Seven. No, I’m Not Tired.

Person One: “The best coverage on the subject I’ve read in years.”

Person Two: “I was thinking the same thing – it sums up the situation beautifully!”

Person One: “Faultless and extremely comprehensive. Amazing though that so many words have to be used to explain the difference between fatigue and some other experience that probably doesn’t yet exist in any dictionary: hence, the art of description is a key aspect of this author’s triumph.”

A Facebook based ME support group shared my blog on their page. 

“I have a new favourite page! Love the posts, love the eloquence, love the wide range of M.E issues it focuses on, love the wealth of information … and I also love puffins and penguins! So it’s an all-rounder, really! Phoebe, who set up and runs the page, lives with severe M.E and I know from experience how much effort, energy and passion it takes to do this kind of thing, so please check it out if you can.”

The scariest post for me to publish was Post Twenty Six. How Having ME Has Affected My Mental Health. Having known people who have accused anyone who is open about their mental health struggles as “attention seeking”, I was really apprehensive about this post, but I received so much wonderful feedback.

“I very much admire the clarity and honesty of your writing. I recognise everything you say as true…your experience which you express so powerfully. I think you are a very special woman.”

“I want to thank you for your honesty and openness in expressing how your anxiety and depression affect you. Your courage in writing this and ‘socialising it’ is very powerful. It has arrived in my world at a time when I can say that from personal experience. I don’t have ME. My son does. But what you say rings very true for me sadly and that is validating. What you feel is what you feel and it’s important that others hold that intact and with respect.”

“You brave and wonderful person, as usual you have expressed so eloquently what many of us feel.”

“What an outstanding piece of writing. I and some of my close family have suffered from (non ME-related) clinical depression and your post perfectly encapsulates the feelings, desperation and hopelessness that depression produces.”

“I read your new blog yesterday. And goodness me it is so brilliant. So many of the things you write resonate deeply with things I’ve felt. And you’re just so good at phrasing things and expressing them. Also your raw and deep honesty is remarkable.”

“It’s brilliant. Really well written and really brave to put your feelings to paper. “

“You are amazing. I think your openness is admirable. People should hear. I’m really glad you are such a strong lady and still holding out and hate that you are having such a rubbish and painful time.”

University of Edinburgh

Something very unexpected happened in 2018. Every year the University of Edinburgh ask their Medical Sciences (BSc) students, as part of their module about long term illness experience, to talk, in pairs, to someone who lives with chronic illness or disability. These students go on to work as doctors, nurses, public health practitioners, research scientists or in other health-related occupations, and they consistently say that they learn the most from this part of the course.

I volunteered to be interviewed and within my email to the course lecturer I included a link to my blog. She replied to tell me that they actually had enough volunteers with ME, but she had read my blog, and thought it would make perfect study material for the module! As a result, my writing and experience reached all sixty students undertaking the course, and was discussed in class.

The class was in October, and I still feel amazed and honoured that my experience of ME was used in the teaching of the next generation of medical professionals, at least in this little corner of the world.

Borders General Hospital

I have been working on a post about my encounters with health professionals since having ME, both the good, the bad, and the downright disgraceful, but in the meantime, here’s one positive encounter I had with a doctor in 2018.

It was at my pre-op assessment appointment for my Endometrial Ablation. I always feel apprehensive about these appointments because I never know how they will react in the face of ME, I have no idea if my needs will be taken seriously, or mocked, or belittled, or just disregarded.

The doctor I saw was young, and, hold onto your seats, the first thing that came out of her mouth, was an apology, for not knowing much about ME. She told me it wasn’t covered at all at any point during her education/training. She asked me if it was ok to ask me some questions about my ME, and ME in general, because she wanted to learn. I was amazed and astounded. This so rarely happens. I have seen health professionals who haven’t heard of ME, or they have heard of it but know nothing about it, or they have heard of it but everything they think they know about it is incorrect, and whichever of these camps they fall in, they are rarely willing to learn from the patient. So I told her. I also gave her a card for my blog – I have some business-type cards for my blog which I always have on me – and I recommended that she watch the film Unrest on Netflix. She told me at the end of the appointment that she was going to spend the next weekend reading my blog and watching Unrest. Result! That’s one more doctor in the world who has a clue about ME.

What’s In Store For Me In 2019

I am hoping that this will be a better year, in terms of my health, blog output, benefits and stress levels, but I do have some big stuff about to happen.

I am planning on selling my flat in Edinburgh.

I moved out in August 2015 and have been renting it out since then. The plan was that the rental income would cover my mortgage, and I would eventually be well enough to move back in and get on with my life. I have now realised that this is not going to happen, the getting better, certainly not anytime soon. What I need to do, is to try and live as comfortably as possible, as I am, with severe ME. This means buying somewhere more suitable to live in Peebles and in order to do that, I have to sell my flat.

I have now given my tenants their notice, which I feel horrible about, I hate to be uprooting them, they’ve been good and hassle-free tenants, and when their tenancy ends, I will be putting my flat on the market. This has been a massive and terribly painful decision. When I moved out in 2015, it did not occur to me for one second that I would never move back in. Now, because I won’t manage the ninety eight steps up to my top/fifth floor flat, I’ll never even set foot in it again, not even to say goodbye.

I was so sure when I moved back to Peebles that it would only be temporary. I was even worried about what I would do if I was well enough to move back in within the first six months of my tenants lease, because within those six months, their tenancy was safe, it wouldn’t have been legal to kick them out. That’s how sure I was that I would recover. As sad as it is to think back to that time, I guess it definitively proves that ME cannot be cured by positive thoughts! Because back then, I absolutely positively thought I would get better, within months.

So anyway, this is big and scary decision, and it’s going to be a stressful few months, what will make it especially stressful for me, is that I have to trust other people to do everything for me. Relinquishing control will not be easy for me, actually, it will be excruciating, but I have no choice. Getting it ready for the publicity photos, the viewings, the packing, the removal of my furniture, all of it, will be outside of my control, which makes me feel sick.

I do however think that this decision perhaps signifies my acceptance of this illness, and my reality. The cottage that I live in now was only ever going to be temporary, and I’m now preparing for the long-term, the house that I will live in for as long as I have ME. If I do however get better, then I’m outta here! Peebles is a lovely town, but it was never where I imagined, or hoped, that I would spend the rest of my life.

I have also set a goal for myself this year. Partly because of a new rather annoying symptom in which I am sensitive to scents (in perfumes, soap, shampoo etc) and because I want to ensure that my presence on earth is doing as little harm as possible, I am planning on replacing all of my household cleaning products, toiletries and cosmetics with cruelty-free, unscented and preferably plastic free brands. I will be using up the items I already own, that I can tolerate, in terms of scent, because I don’t like waste, but I will slowly be replacing all of these products throughout the year.

This year I would also like to streamline my supplements. I want to be sure that the supplements I am taking are necessary, and I want to know if there’s anything I should be taking that I’m not. So I’m hoping to find a good, ME knowledgeable Nutritionist who is either local to me, or can do email/Skype consultations. If anyone can recommend someone, please let me know. Also, for ME people only, if there are any supplements you take that you think I should know about, please do let me know. I already take a few of the typical recommended supplements for ME people – CoQ-10, Acetyl L-Carnitine, L-Theanine, D-Ribose and B12, amongst others.

Now, this goes for all of you and for me, please remember that I have severe ME, this means that I may not be well enough to be successful in these goals, and I reserve the right to not meet them, and to not feel disappointed in myself because of it!

Finally, and slightly depressingly (not Brexit, although that is thoroughly depressing too), this year, on 28th February I will be “celebrating” my five year ME anniversary. While my more obvious ME symptoms didn’t start until late-summer in 2014, my first symptom, the one that started this whole thing, appeared late that night. I actually shared something on Twitter recently about how long I’ve had ME for, and someone commented saying she didn’t realise I was such a newbie, given how knowledgeable I am. This was really lovely to hear, especially from whatever the opposite of a ‘newbie’ is, ‘oldie’ sounds rude, but someone who has had far more experience of ME than I have.

 

NEWS

American Society of Hematology. Erythrocyte Deformability As a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/132/Suppl_1/4874?sso-checked=true

Health Rising. Could Poor Microcirculation Be Causing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)?

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/04/capillaries-microcirculation-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs/

Taylor & Francis Online. Genome-epigenome interactions associated with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15592294.2018.1549769?journalCode=kepi20&#.XAkeXL7haSg.twitter

ME Research UK. Visual aspects of reading performance in myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME).

http://www.meresearch.org.uk/our-research/completed-studies/visual-aspects-of-reading-performance/

Frontiers. The UK ME/CFS Biobank: A Disease-Specific Biobank for Advancing Clinical Research Into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2018.01026/full

Health Rising. Ten Ways to Prove That Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a Serious Illness.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/07/ten-ways-prove-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-serious-illness/

Cosmopolitan. 9 Rounds of Electroshock Therapy. 6 Years Lost. All Because Her Doctors Got It Horribly Wrong.

https://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/a25362145/electroshock-therapy-misdiagnosis/

Health Rising. Death in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) – What has it Told Us? The Autopsy Files.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/12/death-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs-autopsy-files/

Presentation on ME/CFS from the OMF-sponsored Second Annual Community Symposium on the Molecular Basis of ME/CFS at Stanford University: Jarred Younger, PhD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham on “How brain inflammation causes ME/CFS.”

Transcript: https://www.omf.ngo/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/EDITED-Jarred-Younger-How-Brain-Inflammation-Causes-MECFS.pdf

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XrdSlpUQTE

Health Rising. Deconditioning Denied: Could a Large ME/CFS Study End the Deconditioning Myth?

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/16/deconditioning-denied-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-deconditioning-myth/

Nick Brown’s Blog. Have scientists found an explanation for the onset of ME/CFS? 

http://steamtraen.blogspot.com/2018/12/have-scientists-found-explanation-for.html

Simmaron Research. The Probiotic Paradox: When Probiotics Fail or Even Do Harm – an ME/CFS Perspective.

http://simmaronresearch.com/2018/12/probiotic-paradox-probiotics-fail-even-harm-mecfs-perspective/

US National Library of Medicine. Peak Oxygen Uptake in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: A Meta-Analysis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30557887/

Health Rising. Ten Ways To Prove That Exercising Will Not Cure Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS).

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/28/ten-ways-prove-exercising-not-cure-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

Valerie Eliot Smith. Changing the narrative #1: exploring a new approach to strategic communications in the ME community.

https://valerieeliotsmith.com/2019/01/07/changing-the-narrative-1-exploring-a-new-approach-to-strategic-communications-in-the-me-community/

Frontiers. Estimating Prevalence, Demographics, and Costs of ME/CFS Using Large Scale Medical Claims Data and Machine Learning.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fped.2018.00412/full

2 thoughts on “Post Thirty One. A Blog Post (Mainly) About My Blog – Looking Back & Looking Forward.

  1. Congratulations Phoebe. What a great year you have had in terms of ME awareness raising.
    With your five year anniversary and the sake of your flat, and all that means, you have tough times ahead. Be gentle to yourself. Hugs. Sally (parent / carer of an oldie! )

    Liked by 1 person

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