Post Thirty Three. This Is How We Become The #MillionsMissing – A New Project For 2019.

I have decided to undertake a project this year. I wanted to see just how isolated I have become since having ME, so, for the whole of 2019 I will be keeping a record of the time I spend in the company or vicinity of other people.

Why?

As well as satisfying my own curiosity, my aim with this project is to help others understand the extent of the isolation I live in. I want to help people understand just how severely ME limits my ability to interact, communicate with and be around people. I’ve explained before that ME is defined by a pathological inability to produce energy on demand at a cellular level. Unlike the common misconception, ME is not an illness that causes me to feel tired, it’s an illness that limits my energy production. I think most of the people I know can understand how this affects my ability to undertake various physical and cognitive activities, but I’m not sure they know just how severely it affects my ability to simply be around people. I have gone into this before, especially with my last post, Post Thirty Two. Some Things I’d Like My Visitors To Be Mindful Of., in which I explained how carefully I have to plan and manage the time that I spend around people. I think this post and this project as a whole tie in well with Post Thirty Two, but with this project, I’ll actually be able to show them just how drastically my reality has changed due to having ME.

What this project is not about.

Importantly, I want to be sure that people understand that the isolation I live in is not a choice I have made, it’s not because I lack ‘motivation’, nor is it caused by neglect. This project is not a reflection on any of the people in my life, it is not about lost or fading friendships or a lack of offers. I have lost friends, it’s true, but that is irrelevant to this project. I’m not lacking people, I don’t need to join a befriending scheme, what I am lacking is energy, I am simply too unwell to be around people.

This project is not about loneliness. I wouldn’t have the faintest idea how I could calculate the amount of time I feel lonely. It’s too subjective. How would I accurately log a feeling, especially one that comes and goes in waves? Of course I do feel lonely at times, sometimes excruciatingly so, but this project is about isolation, not loneliness. The results of this project will say nothing about how often I did or did not feel lonely in 2019. It is not a project about my emotions, I have no interest in doing that.

It’s not a scientific experiment, it’s a personal project. My counsellor likened it to more of an evolving art installation, which I like the sound of.

How is this going to work?

To figure out how my current level of isolation compares with the time I spent in the company of people before I had ME, I came to a figure that I think represents an average month for me, pre-ME. I based this on the couple of years immediately before I became unwell, from 2012 – 2014.

First, let’s give you an idea of what my life was like in those pre-ME years, in terms of the time I spent around other humans. I worked full-time for a homelessness charity called Cyrenians. My job was based in a small depot in Leith, Edinburgh, with a small team of staff and many volunteers. I also lived in Leith and had a ten minute walk to and from work everyday. I owned a beautiful flat in the Shore area, a top/fifth floor tenement flat with ninety eight stairs to my front door, in which I lived alone. I attended classes at the gym pretty regularly, both Spin and Body Pump. My gym was also in Leith, just round the corner from my work. I also attended an evening class, wood carving, which was again, in Leith. I volunteered with another couple of homeless charities. I socialised with friends on a weekly basis, whether in the pub, a restaurant, a coffee shop, or at the cinema, a concert or the theatre. I also enjoyed spending time alone (but surrounded by people) – reading a book in a coffee shop, exploring museums and art galleries, and I liked to make use of Edinburgh’s many green spaces, Holyrood Park, Arthur’s Seat, Princes Street Gardens, etc. I spent time with my family – my two sisters, my mum and my niece and nephew, who I babysat for fairly regularly. To get around Leith I mainly walked, but to go to the city centre, or anywhere else, I would use the bus. I travelled as much as I could. In those couple of years before ME I especially enjoyed travelling around the UK to see my favourite bands – my favourite bands rarely came to me, so I had go where they went. By turning a concert into a short holiday I got to see parts of the UK I’d never been to before, including Manchester, Cornwall, Halifax and Brighton. I also spent time in London and Kent roughly once a year. I went to Iceland for the first time and I completely fell in love with Reykjavík, and have returned a few times since then. This was my life pre-ME, in terms of the activities I did that involved being with or around other people. It was fun and I was enjoying myself, and despite being an introvert, it was full of people, but perhaps more importantly, it was only full of people as and when I chose to be around people. I was afforded that luxury before I had ME, now my illness dictates when I can be around people.

So, I calculated that, pre-ME, I spent at least 253.4 hours per month in the company of other people. I broke it down as follows…

  • An 8 hour work day Monday to Friday, and 4 hours every fourth Saturday. I haven’t included any overtime.
  • I estimated 18 hours per week for the other activities in which I was in the company of, interacting with, or in the vicinity of other people, as described above.
  • I lived alone pre-ME and I still do, so my time spent around other people will automatically be lower than anyone who doesn’t live alone.

I plan to write a blog post with the results of this project early-2020, or I might coincide it with International ME Awareness Month in May 2020, but I thought I would give you a sneak peek at January’s data.

img_1101
The total time I spent with or around other people in January 2019 was 22 hours. Of this time, 7 hours and 5 minutes were outside of my home.

So, as you can see, I have created categories for each person/set of people – my mum, who is also my carer, other family members, friends, medical, counselling, acupuncture, my cleaner, The Super Store (a shop between my house and my counsellor’s office) and the Sainsbury’s delivery man (for non UK readers, Sainsbury’s is a supermarket).

Each of January’s categories in more detail. 

My mum/carer – 16 hours

It’s important to note that when my mum visits me, it’s not always a social visit, these 16 hours include the time she spends doing various jobs for me around my home – washing my dishes, unpacking groceries, changing my bedding, filling my pill boxes, emptying my bins, etc. So when she’s here for an hour, possibly only half of that time will be spent in conversation. When I’m not feeling well enough for a proper visit she will leave after having done whatever jobs I need doing. So sometimes her visits will be as short as 5 minutes, if she’s only dropping off some shopping, for example.

Other family – 15 minutes

The 15 minutes of ‘other family’ time were when each of my sisters (one with her boyfriend and the other with my niece and nephew) attempted to visit me but I was too unwell each time, so could only have a quick hug/chat by the front door.

Friends – 0

I wasn’t well enough in January to see any friends or do anything beyond the essential (medical, counselling, my mum’s visits etc).

Medical – 1 hour

I had an appointment at Borders General Hospital in January. I have included the time spent in the waiting room. This entire outing took 3 hours, with around 1 hour, maybe a bit longer, being for the actual hospital bit, the rest being the time it took to get there and back. My mum drove me, so I included the travel time in the ‘mum’ category.

Counselling – 3 hours

My counselling appointments are 50 minutes long, but I’ve rounded it up to 1 hour, to include the time I spend walking there and back. This may seem insignificant, but my walk to and from counselling, even though I’m not interacting with any of the people I pass on the way, is the time of the week I feel the least isolated. It’s not just because I can see the other people, they can see me. I’m present, I’m not invisible, I’m out there, existing, not only in my life, but in the lives of the strangers who walk past me on the street. I would compare this to the time I spent walking to and from work, or the gym, or my evening class, or on the bus to and from the city centre in my pre-ME life. This is time spent in the vicinity of other people, but not interacting with them.

Acupuncture – 1 hour 20 minutes

My acupuncture appointments are in my home, roughly every two or three weeks. The actual acupuncture session is 30 minutes, but of course it takes a few minutes to update the acupuncture man with my symptoms since last seeing him and for him to put the needles in, so I log each acupuncture appointment as 40 minutes.

Cleaner – 15 minutes

My cleaner comes round when I have my counselling appointments, and I include the 5 minutes I spend chatting with her before I leave for counselling. Because I can only manage one ‘outside’ appointment per week, if I have a medical appointment, I will cancel that weeks counselling appointment. On those days, when I don’t have counselling, but I still have my cleaner round, I’ll retire to my garden shed to get out of her way, which is nicer than it sounds, my shed is quite lovely.

The Super Store – 5 minutes

The Super Store is a small health food shop just round the corner from my house. I don’t go in often, only occasionally when I’m passing on the way home from counselling, and when I do, I always feel noticeably worse the following day, so I really shouldn’t. I usually have my mum buy what I need from this shop, but sometimes it’s nice to go in and browse and do my own shopping, as though I’m an independent adult.

Sainsbury’s delivery man – 5 minutes

Finally, I included the short time I spent in the company of the Sainsbury’s delivery driver. It might not seem worthy of including, but if I haven’t seen anyone for a few days, those few minutes of interaction can make all the difference.

Outside

Of the total 22 hours I spent in the company of other people in January, 7 hours and 5 minutes of that time were outside of my home – this includes my one medical appointment at Borders General Hospital and the time it took for my mum to drive me there and back, my counselling appointments, and one 1 hour drive with my mum for a change of scenery. This 7 hours and 5 minutes isn’t just the only time I spent outside of my home around other people, but the only time I spent outside of my home in January full stop. This is why I describe myself as ‘mainly housebound’, as opposed to simply ‘housebound’, many people whose ME is more severe than mine are unable to leave their homes, or even their beds, at all. I don’t include the time I spend in my garden as being ‘outside’, I count that as being at home.

Some percentages. 

If the online percentage calculator I found was right (with my ME foggy brain I am not even going to attempt to work out the percentages myself), this means that I spent 91.31% less time in the company of other people in January than I did per month before I had ME.

The pre-ME figure of 253.4 hours was spent mainly outside of my home, so this means that the time I spent outside of my home in January was reduced by 97.11%, when compared to my pre-ME life.

On average there are 730 hours in a month, so based on January’s data, in which I spent 7 hours and 5 minutes of it outside of my home, I am 99% housebound.

I look forward to seeing how these percentages differ as each month passes.

What’s next.

I plan to write a blog post in 2020 with the results of this project. I don’t know yet how I will present the information, what observations I’ll make or what conclusions I will draw. It will be an evolving project, what seems important to me now may not seem so important when it’s time to bring all the information together, and I will add new categories as and when I need to. Hopefully the end result will be of some value, but even if it’s not, it’s a good excuse to play with spreadsheets and percentages, which despite being cognitively draining, I really enjoy!

About the title – This Is How We Become The #MillionsMissing.

I was given the idea for the title of this project by @JBKid7 on Twitter. When I shared my idea for the project with my January stats, @JBKid7 shared it with the caption “This is how ME affects us. This is how we become the #MillionsMissing.”.

If you don’t already know, #MillionsMissing is a global campaign for ME health equality. Lead by #MEAction, the first global protest/demonstration took place in May 2016 and has since grown each year to an astounding 100+ cities and virtual protests in 2018. We protest around the world for increased government funding for research, clinical trials, medical education and public awareness. Most people with ME are too ill to attend the demonstration so they send in shoes with a label summarising their story to symbolise their support. The empty pairs of shoes are displayed at the protest as a striking visual image of the #MillionsMissing.

The name #MillionsMissing symbolises the millions of people with ME who miss out on everyday life, and the millions of pounds missing from biomedical research into this devastating illness. In terms of missing out on everyday life, I thought this would be the perfect title for my project. There are approximately 17 million people with ME worldwide, 250,000 of them here in the UK. That’s a lot of people missing out on everyday life. We are the #MillionsMissing.

 

NEWS

Health Rising. Metabolomics Study Suggests Chronic Fatigue Syndrome May Be Oxidative Stress/Low Oxygen Disease

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2019/02/08/metabolomics-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-oxidative-stress-low-oxygen/

Frontiers. Onset Patterns and Course of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fped.2019.00012/full

PLOS Blogs. Consumer-Contested Evidence: Why the ME/CFS Exercise Dispute Matters So Much

https://blogs.plos.org/absolutely-maybe/2019/02/08/consumer-contested-evidence-why-the-me-cfs-exercise-dispute-matters-so-much/

Bustle. How To Find A Doctor When You Have ME/CFS, Because The Process Can Be Challenging

https://www.bustle.com/p/how-to-find-a-doctor-when-you-have-mecfs-because-the-process-can-be-challenging-15536013

Virology Blog. Trial By Error: HRA Report Does Not Vindicate PACE

http://www.virology.ws/2019/02/06/trial-by-error-hra-report-does-not-vindicate-pace/

White House Chronicle. The Deadly Hurt of Loneliness — It Kills

http://whchronicle.com/the-deadly-hurt-of-loneliness-it-kills/

Springer Link. Myalgic encephalomyelitis or chronic fatigue syndrome: how could the illness develop?

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11011-019-0388-6

 

Post Thirty One. A Blog Post (Mainly) About My Blog – Looking Back & Looking Forward.

My blog was fairly quiet in 2018, with only eight posts. In comparison, I published fifteen posts in 2017, and eight posts in 2016, the first one being in August 2016. My reduced output has been a result of my worsened health and my various other commitments, which all contributed to the worsened health. The majority of 2018 was spent working on my PIP application and ESA renewal (disability benefits/social security), I also spent a lot of time going back and forth to my numerous hospital appointments – two Urology appointments, two Neurology appointments, one Gynaecology appointment, one CT scan, one MRI scan, a pre-op assessment and my Endometrial Ablation procedure. I’m hoping I’ll see fewer doctors this year, although it’s currently eight days in (to 2019) and I’ve already seen one consultant and had an ultrasound – I got to spend Christmas thinking I might have breast cancer – I don’t (phew), and I’m seeing another consultant in March – Gynaecology, again. I am hoping however that I’ll be a bit more prolific with my blog in 2019, I have so much I want to write about.

Stats

I’ve been thinking about what marks the success of my blog. It’s still a baby in the blogging world, when taking the numbers into account, but I take pleasure in seeing the number of people visiting my blog increasing steadily since I began it, from the hundreds to the thousands. I now have almost seven thousand readers, and almost twelve thousand views.

I also love to see how far reaching my blog has become. It seems completely unreal that there are people reading it all over the world. My blog is being read in sixty nine countries, that’s over one third of the world’s countries! See for yourselves!

Blog countries (2)
Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Guatemala, Guernsey, Honduras, Hong Kong SAR China, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jersey, Kenya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Monaco, Morocco, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States and Vietnam.

Feedback

While the stats do make me happy, what means the most to me, is the positive feedback, especially from the ME community. When other people with ME can identify with what I’ve written, when they tell me how accurately I am portraying the illness, when they find comfort in it, when they use it to help educate the people in their lives, it is beyond anything I expected. I am now going to shamelessly blow my own trumpet. Here is a small selection of some of the lovely feedback that I have received.

A comment on Facebook about Post Nineteen. Time For Unrest. 

“I think this is probably the best piece of writing on M.E. I have ever seen. Smiling through the tears. Thank you.”

Someone shared my blog in the Phoenix Rising forum.

“I’ve only just discovered this blog, though I imagine others here in PR will already know of it. Not read all of it by any means, but what I read is good… in the sense it conveys well how bad life can be with ME. And Phoebe, whose blog it is, conveys a good sense of her own self, and hence how ME impacts her, and from that how so many other people are impacted by ME.”

A conversation between two people on Twitter about Post Twenty Seven. No, I’m Not Tired.

Person One: “The best coverage on the subject I’ve read in years.”

Person Two: “I was thinking the same thing – it sums up the situation beautifully!”

Person One: “Faultless and extremely comprehensive. Amazing though that so many words have to be used to explain the difference between fatigue and some other experience that probably doesn’t yet exist in any dictionary: hence, the art of description is a key aspect of this author’s triumph.”

A Facebook based ME support group shared my blog on their page. 

“I have a new favourite page! Love the posts, love the eloquence, love the wide range of M.E issues it focuses on, love the wealth of information … and I also love puffins and penguins! So it’s an all-rounder, really! Phoebe, who set up and runs the page, lives with severe M.E and I know from experience how much effort, energy and passion it takes to do this kind of thing, so please check it out if you can.”

The scariest post for me to publish was Post Twenty Six. How Having ME Has Affected My Mental Health. Having known people who have accused anyone who is open about their mental health struggles as “attention seeking”, I was really apprehensive about this post, but I received so much wonderful feedback.

“I very much admire the clarity and honesty of your writing. I recognise everything you say as true…your experience which you express so powerfully. I think you are a very special woman.”

“I want to thank you for your honesty and openness in expressing how your anxiety and depression affect you. Your courage in writing this and ‘socialising it’ is very powerful. It has arrived in my world at a time when I can say that from personal experience. I don’t have ME. My son does. But what you say rings very true for me sadly and that is validating. What you feel is what you feel and it’s important that others hold that intact and with respect.”

“You brave and wonderful person, as usual you have expressed so eloquently what many of us feel.”

“What an outstanding piece of writing. I and some of my close family have suffered from (non ME-related) clinical depression and your post perfectly encapsulates the feelings, desperation and hopelessness that depression produces.”

“I read your new blog yesterday. And goodness me it is so brilliant. So many of the things you write resonate deeply with things I’ve felt. And you’re just so good at phrasing things and expressing them. Also your raw and deep honesty is remarkable.”

“It’s brilliant. Really well written and really brave to put your feelings to paper. “

“You are amazing. I think your openness is admirable. People should hear. I’m really glad you are such a strong lady and still holding out and hate that you are having such a rubbish and painful time.”

University of Edinburgh

Something very unexpected happened in 2018. Every year the University of Edinburgh ask their Medical Sciences (BSc) students, as part of their module about long term illness experience, to talk, in pairs, to someone who lives with chronic illness or disability. These students go on to work as doctors, nurses, public health practitioners, research scientists or in other health-related occupations, and they consistently say that they learn the most from this part of the course.

I volunteered to be interviewed and within my email to the course lecturer I included a link to my blog. She replied to tell me that they actually had enough volunteers with ME, but she had read my blog, and thought it would make perfect study material for the module! As a result, my writing and experience reached all sixty students undertaking the course, and was discussed in class.

The class was in October, and I still feel amazed and honoured that my experience of ME was used in the teaching of the next generation of medical professionals, at least in this little corner of the world.

Borders General Hospital

I have been working on a post about my encounters with health professionals since having ME, both the good, the bad, and the downright disgraceful, but in the meantime, here’s one positive encounter I had with a doctor in 2018.

It was at my pre-op assessment appointment for my Endometrial Ablation. I always feel apprehensive about these appointments because I never know how they will react in the face of ME, I have no idea if my needs will be taken seriously, or mocked, or belittled, or just disregarded.

The doctor I saw was young, and, hold onto your seats, the first thing that came out of her mouth, was an apology, for not knowing much about ME. She told me it wasn’t covered at all at any point during her education/training. She asked me if it was ok to ask me some questions about my ME, and ME in general, because she wanted to learn. I was amazed and astounded. This so rarely happens. I have seen health professionals who haven’t heard of ME, or they have heard of it but know nothing about it, or they have heard of it but everything they think they know about it is incorrect, and whichever of these camps they fall in, they are rarely willing to learn from the patient. So I told her. I also gave her a card for my blog – I have some business-type cards for my blog which I always have on me – and I recommended that she watch the film Unrest on Netflix. She told me at the end of the appointment that she was going to spend the next weekend reading my blog and watching Unrest. Result! That’s one more doctor in the world who has a clue about ME.

What’s In Store For Me In 2019

I am hoping that this will be a better year, in terms of my health, blog output, benefits and stress levels, but I do have some big stuff about to happen.

I am planning on selling my flat in Edinburgh.

I moved out in August 2015 and have been renting it out since then. The plan was that the rental income would cover my mortgage, and I would eventually be well enough to move back in and get on with my life. I have now realised that this is not going to happen, the getting better, certainly not anytime soon. What I need to do, is to try and live as comfortably as possible, as I am, with severe ME. This means buying somewhere more suitable to live in Peebles and in order to do that, I have to sell my flat.

I have now given my tenants their notice, which I feel horrible about, I hate to be uprooting them, they’ve been good and hassle-free tenants, and when their tenancy ends, I will be putting my flat on the market. This has been a massive and terribly painful decision. When I moved out in 2015, it did not occur to me for one second that I would never move back in. Now, because I won’t manage the ninety eight steps up to my top/fifth floor flat, I’ll never even set foot in it again, not even to say goodbye.

I was so sure when I moved back to Peebles that it would only be temporary. I was even worried about what I would do if I was well enough to move back in within the first six months of my tenants lease, because within those six months, their tenancy was safe, it wouldn’t have been legal to kick them out. That’s how sure I was that I would recover. As sad as it is to think back to that time, I guess it definitively proves that ME cannot be cured by positive thoughts! Because back then, I absolutely positively thought I would get better, within months.

So anyway, this is big and scary decision, and it’s going to be a stressful few months, what will make it especially stressful for me, is that I have to trust other people to do everything for me. Relinquishing control will not be easy for me, actually, it will be excruciating, but I have no choice. Getting it ready for the publicity photos, the viewings, the packing, the removal of my furniture, all of it, will be outside of my control, which makes me feel sick.

I do however think that this decision perhaps signifies my acceptance of this illness, and my reality. The cottage that I live in now was only ever going to be temporary, and I’m now preparing for the long-term, the house that I will live in for as long as I have ME. If I do however get better, then I’m outta here! Peebles is a lovely town, but it was never where I imagined, or hoped, that I would spend the rest of my life.

I have also set a goal for myself this year. Partly because of a new rather annoying symptom in which I am sensitive to scents (in perfumes, soap, shampoo etc) and because I want to ensure that my presence on earth is doing as little harm as possible, I am planning on replacing all of my household cleaning products, toiletries and cosmetics with cruelty-free, unscented and preferably plastic free brands. I will be using up the items I already own, that I can tolerate, in terms of scent, because I don’t like waste, but I will slowly be replacing all of these products throughout the year.

This year I would also like to streamline my supplements. I want to be sure that the supplements I am taking are necessary, and I want to know if there’s anything I should be taking that I’m not. So I’m hoping to find a good, ME knowledgeable Nutritionist who is either local to me, or can do email/Skype consultations. If anyone can recommend someone, please let me know. Also, for ME people only, if there are any supplements you take that you think I should know about, please do let me know. I already take a few of the typical recommended supplements for ME people – CoQ-10, Acetyl L-Carnitine, L-Theanine, D-Ribose and B12, amongst others.

Now, this goes for all of you and for me, please remember that I have severe ME, this means that I may not be well enough to be successful in these goals, and I reserve the right to not meet them, and to not feel disappointed in myself because of it!

Finally, and slightly depressingly (not Brexit, although that is thoroughly depressing too), this year, on 28th February I will be “celebrating” my five year ME anniversary. While my more obvious ME symptoms didn’t start until late-summer in 2014, my first symptom, the one that started this whole thing, appeared late that night. I actually shared something on Twitter recently about how long I’ve had ME for, and someone commented saying she didn’t realise I was such a newbie, given how knowledgeable I am. This was really lovely to hear, especially from whatever the opposite of a ‘newbie’ is, ‘oldie’ sounds rude, but someone who has had far more experience of ME than I have.

 

NEWS

American Society of Hematology. Erythrocyte Deformability As a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/132/Suppl_1/4874?sso-checked=true

Health Rising. Could Poor Microcirculation Be Causing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)?

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/04/capillaries-microcirculation-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs/

Taylor & Francis Online. Genome-epigenome interactions associated with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15592294.2018.1549769?journalCode=kepi20&#.XAkeXL7haSg.twitter

ME Research UK. Visual aspects of reading performance in myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME).

http://www.meresearch.org.uk/our-research/completed-studies/visual-aspects-of-reading-performance/

Frontiers. The UK ME/CFS Biobank: A Disease-Specific Biobank for Advancing Clinical Research Into Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fneur.2018.01026/full

Health Rising. Ten Ways to Prove That Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a Serious Illness.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/07/ten-ways-prove-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-serious-illness/

Cosmopolitan. 9 Rounds of Electroshock Therapy. 6 Years Lost. All Because Her Doctors Got It Horribly Wrong.

https://www.cosmopolitan.com/health-fitness/a25362145/electroshock-therapy-misdiagnosis/

Health Rising. Death in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) – What has it Told Us? The Autopsy Files.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/12/death-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs-autopsy-files/

Presentation on ME/CFS from the OMF-sponsored Second Annual Community Symposium on the Molecular Basis of ME/CFS at Stanford University: Jarred Younger, PhD, of the University of Alabama at Birmingham on “How brain inflammation causes ME/CFS.”

Transcript: https://www.omf.ngo/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/EDITED-Jarred-Younger-How-Brain-Inflammation-Causes-MECFS.pdf

Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8XrdSlpUQTE

Health Rising. Deconditioning Denied: Could a Large ME/CFS Study End the Deconditioning Myth?

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/16/deconditioning-denied-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-deconditioning-myth/

Nick Brown’s Blog. Have scientists found an explanation for the onset of ME/CFS? 

http://steamtraen.blogspot.com/2018/12/have-scientists-found-explanation-for.html

Simmaron Research. The Probiotic Paradox: When Probiotics Fail or Even Do Harm – an ME/CFS Perspective.

http://simmaronresearch.com/2018/12/probiotic-paradox-probiotics-fail-even-harm-mecfs-perspective/

US National Library of Medicine. Peak Oxygen Uptake in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis: A Meta-Analysis.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30557887/

Health Rising. Ten Ways To Prove That Exercising Will Not Cure Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS).

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/12/28/ten-ways-prove-exercising-not-cure-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

Valerie Eliot Smith. Changing the narrative #1: exploring a new approach to strategic communications in the ME community.

https://valerieeliotsmith.com/2019/01/07/changing-the-narrative-1-exploring-a-new-approach-to-strategic-communications-in-the-me-community/

Frontiers. Estimating Prevalence, Demographics, and Costs of ME/CFS Using Large Scale Medical Claims Data and Machine Learning.

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fped.2018.00412/full