Post Twenty Five. General Update, the Last Three Months.

I haven’t posted for a while and I couldn’t decide which of my partially written posts I should complete first, so I decided to start with a general update, to let you know what’s been going on in my life the past few months. One of the benefits of my blog, I’ve discovered, is it saves me energy when I communicate with friends, we don’t have to begin the ‘what have you been up to’ conversation from scratch, if they’ve read my blog. So if I write regular general updates, this will update everyone (who’s interested) in one go, and save me from having to have the same conversation over and over again.

The reason that I haven’t posted anything since February is that I’ve had a really bad few months. My trip to Iceland (see Post Twenty Three. Wheelchair’s First Holiday.) and my screening of Unrest (see Post Twenty Four. Unrest In Peebles.) caused me to relapse. Four months later and I’m still not back to my pre-Iceland levels of ME. I’m managing much less, and I already couldn’t do much, and it takes far less exertion to cause me to crash these days. So I haven’t managed to write much on here, not on top of feeding myself, cleaning myself, getting to counselling and the doctor, which have had to be my priorities.

Mental Health

I also had a huge dip in my depression and anxiety a couple of months ago. I was experiencing frequent panic attacks, I had a constant sense of fear, my mood was incredibly low, and it was having a huge impact on my ME symptoms. I’ve been on and off anti-depressants since 2016, trying to find something that I don’t react badly to (I’m extremely sensitive to medications since having ME). In September last year I started a new one, Bupropion. My GP and I decided I would stay on the lowest dose for a few months before increasing, to give my body time to get used to it. It was during this especially difficult period a couple of months ago that we decided, in the hope it would help me through it, to increase the Bupropion dosage. Unfortunately though, in order to increase the Bupropion, I had to stop taking Amitriptyline, also technically an anti-depressant, but I take it at a low dose as a migraine preventative. The two interact when either are taken at a higher dosage, but due to the severity of my depression at this time, I decided I had to try.

So I phased out the Amitriptyline, and then increased the Bupropion. I knew I would experience the side effects of increasing the Bupropion, I did when I first started it, and the first two weeks both times were absolute hell. As the side effects of the increased Bupropion dosage wore off, I began to realise just how much the Amitriptyline had been doing for me. I already knew how effective it was at reducing the frequency of my migraines, from two or three per week, to two per month. I hoped it wouldn’t happen, but when I stopped, the almost daily migraines returned. It always takes me a few days to recover from a migraine, and when they occur this close together, I basically never have a day off, so I spent a few weeks feeling constantly migrainey. I also stopped sleeping, I did suspect that Amitriptyline helped me sleep, but I guess I’d forgotten, it turns out, in combination with another couple of supplements, it’s essential for me.

One of the benefits I hadn’t known about was how it appeared to help me during my period. Since having ME, I developed Endometriosis (a common occurrence for women with ME), and my period went from being pretty average, to being the most dreaded, painful and generally worst week of the month. Each period caused my ME to relapse, all my ME symptoms worsened considerably. My period itself also became heavier, far far more painful with utterly debilitating cramps (ten out of ten on the pain scale), it made me nauseous and dizzy, and my bladder and guts would join the party too, it was horrendous all round, and I was looking at a possible hysterectomy. But then, thanks to a combination of meds and supplements, it became far more manageable, nowhere near my pre-ME periods, but a lot better. So I was not prepared for my first period after stopping Amitryptyline to be the worst one of my life so far. As well as the worsening of my ME symptoms, migraines, nausea etc, I had cramps so bad that they caused me to double over in agony while walking down the stairs, and resulted in me falling down the stairs, thankfully I wasn’t hurt as I was near the bottom anyway. I decided immediately that I wanted the Amitriptyline back.

So I’m now back on my usual dose of Amitryptyline, 25mg does it for me. Which of course meant I had to either drop back to the lower Bupropion dose, or stop it altogether. I decided to stop altogether, it wasn’t doing anything for me at the lower dose, so there was no point staying on it. I’ve now been back at my normal Amitriptyline dose for two weeks, and have only had one almost-migraine since, the longest I went with no migraine during those horrible few weeks was three days. After much discussion, my GP and I have come to the conclusion that due to my sensitivity to meds, I’m done with anti-depressants, the side effects are too severe, and they mess with my other meds, and none that I have tried so far have worked. So that’s that. I have Diazepam for when my anxiety gets really severe, but when it comes to depression I’m going to have to deal with it unmedicated, which terrifies me, because I fear that it could kill me. But there’s nothing more I can do, other than continue with counselling, keep trying to find things to look forward to, and keep fighting for ME health equality.

An Upsetting Discovery

I wrote in a previous post (Post Eleven. From Healthy To Not Healthy.) about a doctor I saw at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh in 2015…

I saw the ME/Infectious Diseases doctor at the Western General in mid-May. I suppose, being honest, he didn’t really have much in the way of new or useful information for me, but, he listened to me. He gave me an hour and a half to talk. I don’t think I can put into words how good it felt to finally have a medical professional with a knowledge of ME actually listen to me, and believe me, to show me understanding and compassion. We went through my entire medical, and life history. We also bonded over a love of Icelandic music! He too confirmed my diagnosis of ME. All he could have suggested was that I attend the Astley Ainslie ME Service, which I had already been referred to so there was really nothing more he could do. But he helped me enormously, like I said, he was the first example of a doctor who truly believed me and who acknowledged what a devastating and life-changing illness ME is. I really don’t think anyone can understand the importance of this, not until you’ve been there yourself.

In February I discovered something really shocking and upsetting. You’ll have to have some understanding of the PACE Trial in order to understand this, (see my previous post Post Seventeen. The PACE Trial Scandal.). I found out that the doctor I saw, the doctor who I praised, was a co-author of the PACE Trial, he ran the Scottish leg of the Trial. Despite all the evidence to the contrary, this doctor strongly believes that ME is a psychosomatic illness. He believes that we, people with ME, simply ‘believe’ that we have a physiological illness. From speaking to other patients of his, it seems he does take us seriously, and he does want to alleviate unnecessary suffering, he believes ME is a real illness, he believes that we suffer, but he does not believe that ME is a neuro-immune illness, he believes it’s a psychiatric condition. He believes that we have ‘false illness beliefs’, that we simply have a fear of exercise, and that we can overcome these beliefs with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), then we can undergo Graded Exercise Therapy (GET), and recover.

I was shocked when I heard, but all I had to do was Google his name to find proof, I also found some deeply troubling papers that he had written about ME. This man is partially responsible for the NHS treating ME as a psychosomatic disorder, despite the fact that ME is defined as Neurological by the World Health Organisation. How he, and his colleagues can do this, in the face of current research that proves that people with ME have specific defects at a cellular level (plus other science stuff I don’t understand), I just don’t know. I don’t know what his agenda is.

When I met him, I had no idea that from his point of view, I was a psychiatric patient. I felt like he believed me, that’s why I heaped so much praise on him, but seemingly, he only believed, that I believed, that I had a ‘real/physical illness’. So when we spoke, was he simply playing along, indulging my so called fantasy? I feel manipulated. I can only assume that he never brought up his psychosomatic model of ME during our appointment because he knew I had already been referred to Astley Aisnlie Hospital, and assumed they would use CBT and GET to treat me – they did not. They did use CBT, but as a tool to help me cope with my life-changing diagnosis, and I stated at my first appointment that I would not take part in GET, and they were fine with that.

I found this out in February, and I’m still reeling from it. He was nice to me, he treated me kindly, he was charming. But there’s no hiding from the truth now, his professional stance is completely behind the psychological model that states ME is not a physical illness, and that our symptoms could be removed if we wanted it enough. From now on I will research every doctor I see, so I won’t make the same mistake again.

Snow Days

We had some wonderfully snowy weather at the beginning of March. While other people had to deal with closed schools and blocked roads, I just stayed cosy in my cottage and admired the view out the window and wished I was well enough to go out and play in it. Something funny though, I had a few people ask me if I was ok, if I was managing ok being stuck inside due to the snow. This was really kind, it’s nice to be remembered, but, for me, the snow made no difference, at all. I’m always stuck indoors. I have been since mid-2015, when my ME worsened and made me mainly housebound. I was no more stuck inside with the snow, than I am when there’s no snow. But I rarely get asked how I cope with being stuck indoors when it’s ‘just’ due to my illness. Interesting.

Acupuncture

I have wanted to to try acupuncture for a while. I’m not normally one for alternative therapies, but I felt that the anecdotal evidence for acupuncture in the treatment of migraines was strong enough to give it a shot.

Initially I had hoped I could get this treatment on the NHS. It’s not something I would have normally considered (getting on the NHS), except I had read the Scottish Good Practice Statement on ME. These are the guidelines that NHS Scotland use for the treatment of ME, and they actively recommend acupuncture as a treatment for migraines in people with ME. So I asked my GP, and she contacted NHS Borders to ask if this is something they would fund. They would not, unless I attended the pain management programme at the BGH (Borders General Hospital) Pain Clinic.

I actually met with one of the Pain Clinic doctors early-2017 and he told me that the only thing he could offer me was this ten week, weekly, pain management programme. I would have to attend an exercise based workshop once a week at the BGH. He was actually fairly well informed about ME, and he advised that this course would be unsuitable for me, due to the exercise based approach, and the fact that I’d have to make the journey to the BGH every week for ten weeks, which is just not do-able for me. He also told me that acupuncture was not available on the NHS, this was before I had read the Scottish Good Practice Statement, and I believed him.

So, NHS Borders have denied me funding for an officially recommended treatment, that could help me, unless I attend a course that would cause me harm, a course that I was advised not to do by the actual doctor who runs it. Bonkers, I know.

After finding funding for it elsewhere, I then began my search for a private acupuncturist who could do home visits. I found someone from Borders Chiropractic and he comes to my home every Monday. It’s too soon, and there have been too many variables (on and off Amitriptyline, Bupropion etc) the last couple of months, to say if it’s having an effect. I do find the actual appointment very relaxing, and twice so far I have spent the rest of the day (after the appointment) feeling better than I have for ages. I want to give it at least six months before I make my evaluation.

Blue Badge

In the last couple of months I successfully applied for a Blue Badge, which means I (my mum, me as the passenger) can now use designated disabled parking spaces. I hardly go anywhere, so it won’t get used much, but it’s really useful for hospital appointments. The BGH is huge (as are most hospitals), and every appointment involves too much walking, so now I don’t go without my wheelchair. Having the extra space around the car for folding and unfolding my wheelchair is great, I can faff around without worrying about being hit by a car, that’s always a good thing. Of course being able to park close to the hospital also helps with my overall energy usage. The process of getting the Blue Badge was unpleasant, but it was through my local council, so it wasn’t as bad as dealing with the DWP. Stuff like this is always disheartening though, when I have to defend my need for support as a chronically ill/disabled person, I feel as though I have been reduced to a list of symptoms on a form and how they affect me, it’s never a pleasant experience.

New Neurologist

I had a really positive appointment with a new neurologist. He was surprisingly, although I still say this cautiously, helpful. He seemed sensitive in regards to ME, no eye rolling, no disparaging remarks, no (obvious) disbelief. He acknowledged that a lot of my symptoms are neurological, and are indicative of both ME and/or MS. Next step, an MRI of my brain and spinal cord. I’m pleased that he wants an MRI of my spinal cord. Since I read about a small study regarding the improvement of severe ME symptoms following surgical treatment of cervical spinal stenosis, I’ve been wondering if this could be an issue for me, the MRI will let me know. It will also be really interesting to find out if I do have inflammation of my brain and spinal cord, which would be the ‘Encephalomyelitis’ of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Although some do disagree about the appropriateness of this name for the illness. The ME Association, for example, prefer Myalgic Encephalopathy, with ‘Encephalopathy’ meaning damage or malfunction of the brain, as opposed to inflammation. Whatever he finds, it’s good to have a proactive Neurologist, who plans to follow up and see me again whatever the outcome of the MRI, he wants to help alleviate my suffering, whatever the cause.

Bladder/Uterus/Period Stuff

*If this stuff grosses you out (but why?!) then maybe skip this bit. This is also your warning that I may be stepping into ‘too much information’ territory, so if you don’t want ‘too much information’, don’t read it!

My bladder symptoms returned with a vengeance in February so I’ve been referred to a new Urologist. I’d put this off as the symptoms had lessened, and Urologists aren’t much fun, they like to do invasive bladder procedures, obviously. This may be way too much information, but, why not (I used to be so private, but now I couldn’t care less). Back when my period was really bad, I bought a menstrual cup in the hope it would handle the heaviness of my period, I also liked the idea for environmental reasons, much better to buy one product that I can use every month for ten years, than multiple products per period that end up in landfill. I found out unfortunately, that for some reason, my bladder does not like having a menstrual cup next door to it. Each time I tried it, my bladder symptoms were exacerbated. So I gave up, until a few months ago. I dug out the menstrual cup, sterilised it, and tried again, and that’s what triggered the return of my bladder symptoms. So, I wonder what the Urologist will make of that. I think my pelvic floor muscle is knackered, it’s the only thing that I can think of that, literally, connects all this stuff. I’ve also developed some other new issues surrounding my period. Not only can I not use a menstrual cup, I now experience pain when using tampons, but my period is far too heavy to not use tampons, pads alone are just useless for me.

I’m wondering if my Endometriosis is back. It was almost two years ago when I had surgery and the Endometriosis was cauterised, but it can grow back, the only way to know though, is with more surgery. If my ME wasn’t such a massive and annoying complication I would ideally like a Hysterectomy. I’ve been asking for one since I was sixteen, I have no need for a uterus as I have known since I was a teenager that I didn’t want to have children. But, given how my ME has reacted to hormonal birth control (permanent relapses both times), there is a risk that a Hysterectomy, and the compulsory Hormone Replacement Therapy, could cause another severe and permanent relapse. There’s just no way of knowing what would happen, and a Hysterectomy is of course irreversible, so it would be a huge gamble. I’m also considering Endometrial Ablation, it sounds a bit scary, permanently disfiguring my uterus, but it could be a good compromise. It would make my period lighter and shorter, or even better, it could eliminate it altogether.

Given these particular sets of symptoms seem to be intertwined somewhat, what I really need is to see a Urologist and a Gynaecologist in the same room at the same time, but for some reason that’s just not possible. Apparently modern medicine believes that human bodies are made up of separate parts that never interact.

Fundraising For ME Research

I’ve had some family and a friend do some fundraising for ME research again this year!

My brother-in-law John is running to raise money for Invest In ME Research! He ran the Stirling marathon on 29th April and will run two half marathons in Edinburgh and Alloa on 27th May and 3rd June. His goal is to raise £2500 and at £1932.40 he doesn’t have far to go! You can make a donation here.

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/john-mcglynn3

My friend Paul walked the Northumberland Coastal Challenge  (26.2 miles) on 7th May to raise money for ME Research UK! His goal was £250 which he exceeded by raising £330! You can still make a donation here.

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/PaulwalkforME

In March my niece Amelia (with help from her mummy/my sister Emma), hosted an afternoon tea on the Mother’s Day weekend to raise money for Invest In ME Research and her gym, Astro Gymnastics. She raised £403.34 in total, so £201.67 for each charity!

My mum, for the second time, donated her birthday, which happens to fall on International ME Awareness Day, to Invest In ME Research! She threw a huge party and asked for donations only, no gifts or cards. She’s still to receive some donations but it looks like she’ll have raised around £1000!

Many thanks to John, Paul, Amelia, Emma, my mum and everyone who donated. Every penny that goes to Invest In ME Research and ME Research UK goes directly into biomedical research, which is the only hope we have to find a cure.

#MEAction 

I’m very happy to announce that I am now officially part of the #MEAction Scotland team!

The MEAction Network, co-founded by Unrest Director Jennifer Brea, is a worldwide ME patient advocacy group fighting for health equality for ME. The focus is on empowering patients to take action to improve the research and treatment situation, through local affiliate groups in countries around the world.

My involvement is with our public Facebook page, currently called Millions Missing Scotland, but we hope to soon change the name to #MEAction Scotland. The purpose of this page is to communicate about ME events, activities and news to our followers, and to provide a platform for sharing information about things happening in Scotland. I’m an administrator for the page and will be/have been posting ME related articles, research and news to the page. Basically, the ME news that I’ve been sharing publicly on my own Facebook page, I will now be sharing on the Millions Missing Scotland (soon to be #MEAction Scotland) Facebook page. I urge anyone who likes to read what I post on my own page, in regards to ME news, please do like and follow our page. We want this page to be Scotland’s hub of ME related news. Everything relevant to our illness; fundraising, petitions, research, etc, will all be shared here.

We also have a closed Facebook group called #MEAction Scotland. The group is a community, to get ME advocates in the same place to share ideas and get people involved in ME advocacy. You need to join the group (by request) to be able to post and read other people’s posts. It’s a great place to share ideas and brainstorm about fundraising events, or anything related to ME advocacy. You don’t have to have ME to join the group, our healthy allies are just as important in our advocacy efforts.

ME Awareness Month and #MillionsMissing

May is International ME Awareness Month, with ME Awareness Day falling on May 12th, which was Florence’s Nightingale’s birthday, who reportedly suffered from ME herself.

We have had a lot of press coverage this month. In particular, in response to the new BBC Newsbeat documentary M.E. and Me (available on BBC iPlayer and YouTube) and also in anticipation of the 100+ #MillionsMissing protests that took place globally on Saturday 12th May.

Press coverage is good, but I’ve actually been really disappointed in a lot of the articles I’ve seen. So many start off well, but the reporter then rounds the story off with incorrect details that they’ve clearly found online, such as ‘the recommended treatments are CBT and GET’, with no word that these are actually dangerous and are not based on evidence. I’ve only seen one article (The Canary – see link below in the News section) correctly identify the main symptom of ME. They almost all say that the main symptom of ME is being extremely tired, or something along those lines, but never the actual main symptom – the abnormal response to exertion. Or they use ‘Chronic Fatigue’ in the headline, but then refer to it as ME in the article. This results in people conflating the neuro-immune illness ME, with the symptom Fatigue, which is exactly what we need to be moving away from.

These articles, even with only one error, don’t do us any good. People who don’t know otherwise will read them and go away believing that we have safe treatment options and that we’re just tired. What if these people are on the review team for the NICE guidelines, or are in any way involved with decision making for the support, funding and treatment of ME? Or what if they’re just normal people who are one day presented with a petition to sign, or a campaign to fund for biomedical research? Well, they’ll look the other way, because as far as they’re concerned, based on those many articles they read, we’re already sorted, we have treatments and we don’t need their help.

I see other people with ME celebrating the press coverage, while seemingly not releasing that most of it is harming us. As long as this continues I don’t see anything changing. So what we need to do is comment on these articles, or contact the reporter directly, and put them right. Be polite, thank the reporter for the article, but inform them of the errors, and how those errors impact on people with ME. Then hopefully they’ll be encouraged to continue writing about us, but with the truth.

I was unable to attend the Edinburgh #MillionsMissing protest. Initially because I had hoped to go my mum’s fundraising party that day, but actually I was unable to attend either, making it a pretty miserable day for me. On the one day of the year that people with ME become that bit less invisible, I felt more invisible than ever.

Thankfully though, I was able to watch the events in Edinburgh as they were streamed live via Facebook! The opening speech was especially moving, and rousing, it made me sob, and it made me angry, as it should, it should make everyone angry. I also really liked this line from a poem read in the second clip (after Stuart Murdoch’s speech, about 26 mins in). “So you think I’m looking well. Thank you. But in return I’ll say. My brain and nervous system, aren’t usually on display.”. I think I’ll keep that for whenever I’m told I’m looking well. 😉

Here are some clips from the event, for those who would like to watch.

In this clip there’s the introductory speech by Gerry Farrell, laying of the final shoes and a crowd photo for the press attending.

In this clip Stuart Murdoch, lead singer of Belle & Sebastian, speaks to the huge crowd (at 17 mins in). Sing in the City Choir perform, and people read stories and poems of their lives with ME. 

In this clip MP Carol Monaghan speaks (at 31 mins in), Sing in the City Choir perform again, and more powerful stories and poems are read by and for people with ME.

In this clip Emma Shorter, co-founder of #MEAction Scotland, speaks (at 15 mins in) and leads a mass lie down in the precinct with shoppers and passers-by seeing hundreds of bodies on the ground. And the band Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing perform.

Many thanks to #MEAction Scotland for organising this incredible event, all the volunteers, an incredible effort by people with ME and our healthy allies. Thank you to all the speakers and performers. Thank you to everyone who attended. And thank you to the wonderful volunteer who live-streamed these clips for those of us unable to be there.

Petition

I often have people ask what they can do to help me. Well, this is it, this is what would help me. Please sign and share this petition. Every signature brings us closer to the goal of effective treatment and care for people with ME in Scotland, and beyond.

We are calling on the Scottish Parliament to urge the Scottish Government to review the level of support for people with ME in Scotland with a view to:

  • Investing in biomedical research and creating a centre of excellence for ME
  • Ensuring healthcare professionals’ training and education materials reflect the latest scientific evidence
  • Providing specialist care for patients and discontinuing the harmful treatments graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

The deadline is 31st May and we need as many signatures as possible by then. You do not have to be Scottish or living in Scotland to sign!

Please Sign and Share!

http://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01690

Watch our video to find out more!

Upcoming Blog Posts

Like I said earlier, I have many partially written blog posts, some of them I began writing over a year ago! Most of what you read here takes me weeks or months to write, I tend to dip in and out as and when I feel motivated and well enough.

If you’re wondering what’s to come, these are the subjects that I’ve been thinking of addressing…

  • A hugely significant reanalysis and evaluation of the discredited PACE Trial was published in March this year and it had an enormous impact. I began a post about this the same day, but have been too unwell to complete it. Soon, I hope.
  • Unsolicited advice, specifically, unsolicited medical advice – it’s the worst.
  • My experience of Ableism. It’s everywhere.
  • Hobbies, what I can and can’t do to occupy my time – how having ME has changed this.
  • How I cope with the isolation that living with severe ME brings – not very well.
  • Surprising things about ME – surprising symptoms and surprising ways in which my symptoms affect me.
  • My experience of ME awareness amongst medical professionals – it’s not good.
  • My experience of claiming disability benefits – it’s really not good.
  • Future employment options. What will I do should I be well enough to work again one day?
  • What chronic illness has done to my friendships – some strengthened, some distanced, some gone.
  • My depression and anxiety, in more depth – I’m honest about my ME, so why not my mental health?
  • The difference between being tired and having ME – lots of differences, they are not the same thing.
  • Hypersensitivity – one of the weirder symptoms I suffer from and it’s possibly the hardest to explain to other people – yes, the rustling sound of that plastic bag actually causes me pain.

Do you have any ideas for future posts? If there is anything you would like me to write about, I make no promises, but I’m happy to receive your suggestions!

 

NEWS

The (Australian) Guardian. To the #MillionsMissing with ME/CFS, something remarkable is happening.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/12/to-the-millionsmissing-with-mecfs-something-remarkable-is-happening?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

The Canary. On Saturday ‘millions’ of ‘missing’ people will reappear for the day.

https://www.thecanary.co/discovery/analysis-discovery/2018/05/09/on-saturday-millions-of-missing-people-will-reappear-for-the-day/

The Scotsman. Belle and Sebastian singer Stuart Murdoch on coping with ME.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/health/interview-belle-and-sebastian-singer-stuart-murdoch-on-coping-with-me-1-4738083

Health Rising. Stanford Exercise Study Shows Different Immune Response in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/03/05/chronic-fatigue-stanford-exercise-immune-response/

The ME Association. A misunderstood disease wrongly labelled make-believe by some GPs is more devastating to sufferers than multiple sclerosis, a new scientific study has found.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/me-association-press-release-people-with-m-e-measurably-more-disabled-than-people-with-multiple-sclerosis-16-march-2018/

Health Rising. The Cortene Way: New Drug to Be Trialed in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Soon.

Part Three. https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/03/16/cortene-drug-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs-pt-iii-the-clinical-trial/

The ME Association. Chronic fatigue syndrome possibly explained by lower levels of key thyroid hormones.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/frontiers-press-release-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-possibly-explained-by-lower-levels-of-key-thyroid-hormones-20-march-2018/

BMJ Journals. Markers of non-coeliac wheat sensitivity in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://gut.bmj.com/content/early/2018/03/17/gutjnl-2018-316133

The New York State Department of Health update their information about ME.

https://health.ny.gov/diseases/conditions/me-cfs/

The Evening Standard. Google Maps becomes more wheelchair friendly with launch of journey-planner tool for disabled people.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/google-maps-becomes-more-wheelchair-friendly-with-launch-of-new-tool-helping-disabled-people-a3791461.html

The Guardian. New initiative to address ticketing barriers for deaf and disabled fans.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/09/access-is-everything-deaf-disabled-live-music-events

STV News. Disabled Scots ‘will not face unnecessary medical checks’. New legislation paves the way for the creation of a new benefits regime in Scotland.

https://stv.tv/news/politics/1413084-disabled-scots-will-not-face-unnecessary-medical-checks/

 

Post Twenty Four. Unrest in Peebles.

Last month I hosted a screening of the documentary, Unrest, at my local theatre, the Eastgate Theatre and Arts Centre in Peebles. If you’re new to my blog and/or are not familiar with the film you can check out the trailer Unrest Official Trailer, and you can read my previous post Post Nineteen. Time For Unrest..

When I first heard about Unrest I knew that I wanted to arrange a screening locally. This wasn’t just a film. It was the beginning of a movement. A documentary created by Jennifer Brea, that the rest of us (people with ME) could use as a tool to create change, and cure the ignorance. Unfortunately, and somewhat ironically, I realised early on that my own ME was going to prevent me from following through, and I planned to abandon the idea. But then my mum and my friend Heather stepped in and took over for me. I kind of coordinated it via email and made sure to guide them, but really they took on most of the organisation. Heather in particular took on pretty much all of the promotion, which, given most people won’t choose to see a documentary about an illness they’ve never heard of, know nothing about, or don’t think is real, was crucial. She did an incredible amount of work, and I can’t thank her enough.

It was very lucky that I felt well enough on the day to attend, especially given I was in a major crash having returned from a few days in Iceland only two and a half weeks beforehand, but the screening went really well and it was a really lovely evening. It was wonderful to see so many people there, and I was especially touched that so many of my friends attended, especially those who travelled down from Edinburgh on a work night. There had been weather warnings in place and the evening before the screening I was pretty sure none of the Edinburgh lot would make it. I felt disappointed, but of course their safety had to come first, given the risk of snow and ice on the roads. But thankfully on the day of the screening the weather cleared, the roads were black and they almost all made it. There wasn’t enough time to catch up with everyone properly, but there were lots of greetings and hugs in the foyer of the theatre in the twenty minutes before the film. Having so many friends there was really amazing. It sounds sickeningly schmaltzy, but I could feel the warmth of all the people who were there, to support me. I think that evening was genuinely the happiest I’ve felt in a really long time. For a short while I really felt like Phoebe again, and for a moment, with the buzz of the activity in the foyer, I almost forgot why we were all there. It was only when I sat down in the auditorium, and the film began to roll, that I remembered, we were all there to watch Unrest together. For the first time, my friends are going to see a glimpse of my life. It was a big deal.

Since having ME, my friends and family only see me on my better days. Only my mum has seen me at my worst, although, saying that, she hasn’t seen me when I’ve been reduced to crawling, so even she hasn’t seen me at my very worst. Having company when I’m having bad days, or even on normal days (depending on my individual symptoms), just isn’t an option. Partly because I don’t have the energy to interact with people, but mainly, I simply cannot stand to have anyone else in the same room when I’m suffering that badly. The sounds, the movement, just feeling the energy of another person there, is unbearable, and painful, in ways I just don’t know how to describe. It’s a really weird symptom of ME.

Anyway, when the film began, the enormity of the evening, and what my friends were about to see, in my presence, really hit me, and I had a bit of an emotional reaction. I had to work really hard to hold in the tears, and I’m not just talking watery eyes, I could feel my whole body starting to shake, it felt like I was beginning to hyperventilate. I closed my eyes and concentrated on my breathing. Once I gained control of myself, and had acknowledged to myself what a significant occasion the evening was, but it was all good, I was able to watch the film without any further emotional breakdowns.

After the film we had a short break and then the scary bit began, I took part in an informal Q&A session, along with Vicky, a new friend who lives locally, and mother to a teenage daughter who has severe ME. My mum had the job of running around with the microphone.

I had months to think about what I wanted to gain from the evening. There were certain topics that I really wanted to share with the audience. I just had to hope that they would ask the right questions. Luckily I managed to work these into the discussion. Mainly, I wanted to give the audience an understanding of the politics and the controversy surrounding ME research and treatment in the UK, the PACE Trial, and the upcoming review of the treatment guidelines for ME by NICE (the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence), whose guidelines are used by the NHS.

I wanted people to understand what the main, and cardinal symptom of ME is, Post Exertional Malaise. It’s not fatigue, as many people think. PEM is THE defining symptom, it’s what sets ME apart from every other fatiguing illness, without it, you don’t have ME. But the word ‘Malaise’ is awful. When I hear it, I a picture a swooning Victorian lady, lying on a day bed being fanned by her maid. Whereas the reality is brutal. I wrote about this in my last post so I won’t go on, apart from this, someone I follow on Twitter recently described PEM as meaning, ‘all systems go’, when each and every symptom flares up in a violent attack on the body. That, I can relate to.

I also wanted to challenge people’s perceptions that they have about chronic illness, especially in terms of the invisibility of ME. This is something that bothers me. People often comment on how well I look, and I get that the sentiment is coming from a kind place, and I expect they mean it as a compliment. But I find it a bit odd, and tiresome. While I know that there’s no malice behind it, it’s not something I take as a compliment. You can tell that me I look nice, if you think I do, but there’s no need to tell me that I look well, when you know that I’m not. I have an invisible illness. Phoebe with ME looks just the same as Phoebe without ME. Telling me I look well, it really doesn’t mean anything, but it does ignore the very real internal battle going on inside my malfunctioning body, and this kind of invalidates the very real everyday struggle of living with ME. It also plays into the fear (reality) that everyone with ME shares, that people don’t believe us. The fact that we, on the whole, look well, is one of the reasons why doctors dismiss us, it’s why we don’t get disability benefits, it’s why we get abuse for using a Blue Badge, it’s why we get reported to the DWP for benefit fraud, it’s why the general public believe we are either lazy, or faking it. I’ve had close friends, on seeing me wearing make-up, with freshly washed hair being chatty and smiling, insist that I must be doing better. I tell them that I’m actually not, it’s just the make-up etc. But they still insist that there must be more to it, and none of my insisting that there is in fact, not more to it, changes their minds.

I only tend to look ‘unwell’ on the bad days, when in a crash. And when I’m in a crash, you don’t see me. So on the occasions that you do see me, it’s when I’m having a better day. But don’t be mistaken, on these days I am still seriously and chronically ill. It does not mean I am recovering, it only means I am having a better day, or a better few hours. I am still, overall, just as unwell as I was during my last crash. Some people however, just don’t get it. Sometimes I feel that I should make an effort to look less well, so that I’ll meet other people’s expectations of what a chronically ill person looks like. It does frustrate me, big time. The fact that some people don’t get it, I guess it means I’m not doing as good a job of educating people as I had thought.

So one of my goals of the evening was to let people see, via Unrest, what we tend to look like during a crash. And how quickly we can go from looking well and happy, to lying on the ground in a fetal position screaming and crying out in pain. I can’t help but wonder how many people at the screening struggled to rationalise the story they saw on film, and the story I tell them, with the Phoebe they saw in front of them that evening. I had made an effort with my make-up and I wore a pretty dress (it got compliments, as did I actually). And because I was excited to be out, and to see so many friends, I’m sure I came across as happy and animated. Which I was, but I also felt unwell, because I have ME, and ME is chronic, which means I always feel unwell.

Another goal of mine, not just with the screening of Unrest but with my blog too, is to help people see ME for what it is. I dream of a world when we can tell someone we have ME, and they would immediately ‘get’ it. They would understand the gravity of what they were being told, in the same way as they would a Cancer, Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s diagnosis. I wish that one day we will have the ‘luxury’ of just being ill, without the stigma, the disbelief, or the need to tirelessly educate everyone around us. As an example, my dad was the first person I knew who had (early onset) Alzheimer’s. Before his diagnosis I had little knowledge about Alzheimer’s, what I knew was only what I had learned in passing, I guess mainly from TV, and news articles. But, when he was diagnosed, I did know it was bad, I knew it was the worst outcome given the other possible options. I knew his life was effectively over, I knew he would never be the same, I knew he would stop being ‘dad’, I knew it meant he’d have it forever, and I knew he would die because of it, and this was before I’d done any active research on the disease.

People don’t get that about ME. Until they actively research the illness, they don’t know that it’s incurable, they don’t know that not everyone recovers, they don’t know how disabling it is, they don’t know how dangerous over-exertion is, they don’t know that we have no treatment options. They don’t know that people with ME have been found to have a lower quality of life when compared with other major illness, they don’t know that people die from it. They don’t know how common it is, there are an estimated 250,000 sufferers in the UK, in comparison, there are 100,000 people with MS, and 145,000 people with Parkinson’s. Everything they think they know, is wrong. They think we’re ‘just tired’, they think it’s psychological rather than physiological and they think we can cure it with lifestyle changes. Now I include myself in this, I wasn’t as ignorant as some/many people I’ve come across, but I had no idea when I was diagnosed how serious  and life-altering it was. This needs to change. And to do this we need to help the general public gain a basic, but accurate knowledge of ME, and I think Unrest has taken us one step forward in achieving this.

Unrest has had a huge impact, for which I’m very grateful. But there’s something that has been bothering me. I’m in a few ME social media support groups and am a fairly active member of the ME Twitter community. I have heard many accounts from people with ME, all over the world, whose family and friends were sceptical of the severity, or even the existence, of their illness. It was only after watching Unrest, that they came around and believed them. This has happened with me too. I’ve had a handful of people who have basically been silent since my diagnosis three years ago, who thought that I was ‘just tired’. But then they watched Unrest, they broke their silence, and they now believe me. It’s wonderful that Unrest is having this impact. But, it does bother me that these people had to hear it from someone else (Jennifer Brea) before they would believe me. Why was I, the person who is in their life, who has ME, not a credible enough source? I cannot wrap my head around this. When someone tells me about one of their traumatic experiences, something that I’ve never been through, whether an illness, a divorce, an abusive relationship, a miscarriage, or whatever, I believe them. I don’t need proof. I don’t need to see evidence in the form of a polished, critically-acclaimed, well edited, beautifully scored award winning film. I think this points to a few things; the level of stigma that exists when it comes to ME (the whole lying, lazy, work-shy, benefit scrounging, hypochondriac, malingerer thing), the fact that this illness is so much more disabling than a healthy person could possibly conceive of, and maybe there’s some fear in there too, these people don’t want to admit that such an illness exists, because if they do, then they have to acknowledge that it could happen to them. I guess, like Jen’s doctors, some people do need to see it on video, with their own eyes, before they’ll believe it.

Anyway, the Q&A went well I thought. I was able to mention the flawed and now thoroughly debunked (but not yet retracted) PACE Trial. The only clinical trial in the UK to be funded by the DWP (Department for Work and Pensions), the people who decide if we get disability benefits or not. The reported results of the trial stated that we could be cured by CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy), which would cure us of our ‘false illness beliefs’ and our ‘fear’ of exercise. Once cured of those pesky false beliefs then we should take part in GET (Graded Exercise Therapy) and hey presto we’re cured. Except we’re not, we get worse, or in some cases, we die. GET has been proven to be harmful to people with ME. The authors of the trial inflated their statistics, which was only brought to light after they were made, by court order, to release their raw data for reanalysis. They changed their definition of what constituted as ‘recovered’ midway through the trial. Participants could finish the trial worse than before they started, and were still counted as recovered. This trial is now widely known as a very good example of how not to run a clinical trial. But, and this is an absolute atrocity, the results of this trial are still used as the basis of the current treatment guidelines, not just in the UK, but worldwide. The results of this trial also influence our access to disability benefits. Claimants are often told they won’t get anything if they don’t first undertake CBT and GET. Now isn’t it interesting that this trial was funded by the DWP…

For more information about the PACE Trial you can read my previous post Post Seventeen. The PACE Trial Scandal. and Post Twenty Two. Reblog. An Interview with Dr David Tuller. .

Thankfully, although I’m not feeling optimistic about it, NICE have agreed to review their guidelines for the treatment of ME. It’s in the early stages and won’t be complete until 2020, and in the meantime they still recommend CBT and GET as treatments, which is unfortunate, and I think, criminal. After the first stakeholder meeting last month I was feeling optimistic, and I shared this at the Q&A. Professor Mark Baker, the Director of the Centre for Guidelines at NICE had said during the meeting “We are going to tear it up and start again. We won’t allow it to look the same.”, he also apparently (I read in an account by someone who was there, you can read it here) reiterated several times that the guideline was to be replaced in full. I found this reassuring. But not long after this, he pretty much backtracked on what he said at this meeting. So my optimism is now thoroughly out the window. You can find a link to the most recent update by NICE in the news section below. I have also shared a link to the communication between the UK charity, Invest in ME Research and Professor Baker.

Included in the film Unrest, is the story of Karina Hansen, a young Danish woman with ME who was forcibly removed from her home, and her parents, and institutionalised. The authorities in Denmark believe that ME is a psychological illness, and that her parents were indulging her false beliefs that she was ill, so she was removed, for ‘her own protection’. She was kept from her family for three years, when she was allowed to return home, her ME had deteriorated. You can read the full story here. What Vicky and I also wanted to convey during the Q&A was that this was not one isolated case, this also happens in the UK, to children. There are also hundreds of cases in the UK of parents being reported to social services for the mistreatment of their children, because they have refused to force them into CBT and GET, knowing it would harm them. Tymes Trust is the only national UK ME charity dedicated to children and young people with ME and their families. You can find their website here, for more information.

So those were the main things that I wanted to share during the Q&A, which I was able to. I feel it’s important that people know about the abuse, neglect and mistreatment that we, the people with ME face. I don’t think anything will change until the general public are angry enough to help us fight this. Unfortunately, because it was almost a month ago, I don’t remember all the questions that were asked, if anyone who was there would like more information about anything please do contact me. You can contact me in the comments below, or using the Contact page, or via Facebook or Twitter. I’d also really like to hear what people thought of the film, what was going through your mind on the way home, not just after this screening, but wherever you saw it. Please share in the comments! For me, the goal of the screening was to educate people, and I left the theatre that evening feeling happy and proud. But what was more valuable for me, was that moment of feeling ‘normal’, even though it was just a few minutes, I felt like pre-ME Phoebe. I was out, dressed up, in a theatre, surrounded by people, in my natural habitat. I genuinely forgot for a little bit that I had ME, and that’s never happened to me before. ME dominates every single moment of every single day, there’s usually no forgetting. Another good thing that came out of this screening was, after the fees were paid for the venue hire and the film licence etc, it turns out we made a profit! £342! We are, or already have, donated this to the UK charity, Invest In ME Research. 😀

Again I’d like to thank my mum and Heather for organising this screening. I do think it’s probably one my biggest accomplishments since having ME, that and this blog. I’m really proud that we pulled it off, and it just wouldn’t have happened without my mum or Heather. I would like to thank Vicky for joining me on the panel for the Q&A. I would also like to thank everyone at the Eastgate for their help in making this happen, the audience who came along for the film and/or the Q&A and everyone who took part in the discussion. And of course all the people who have ME who came along, you’ll all have suffered for it, I certainly have (that’s why this post is a month late), thank you so much for joining us, and well done!

One last thing. Thank you everyone who commented on and contacted me after I published my last post. As I’m sure you realised it was a tremendously difficult thing to share, to expose myself like that (if you read it you’ll know what I’m referring to). I expected silence, or maybe even judgement, so the kind and supportive comments really meant a great deal to me. Thank you.

 

NEWS

NICE announces next steps in updating its guideline on ME/CFS.

https://www.nice.org.uk/news/article/nice-announces-next-steps-in-updating-its-guideline-on-me-cfs

Invest in ME Research. Communication with Professor Mark Baker, Director, Centre for Guidelines, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), in regards to the upcoming review of the current NICE guidelines for the treatment of ME.

http://www.investinme.org/IIMER-Newslet-1801-01.shtml#IiMER-reply18-2

Invest In ME Research. Statement Following Preliminary Phase III Rituximab Clinical trial Results from Norway.

http://www.investinme.org/IIMER-Newslet-1802-01.shtml

Health Rising. The Cortene Way: New Drug to Be Trialed in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Soon.

Part One. https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/02/08/cortene-way-new-drug-trialed-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs-soon-pt/

Part Two. https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/02/17/cortene-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-hypothesis/

The ME Association. A recent study from a research group at Newcastle University has found elevated BNP levels in ME/CFS associated with cardiac dysfunction.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/MEA-Summary-Review-Elevated-BNP-and-Cardiac-Function-in-MECFS-14.02.18.pdf

The ME Association. Two research studies recently reported similar findings relating to the autonomic nervous system in people with ME/CFS.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/MEA-Summary-Review-Dysfunctional-ANS-in-MECFS-24.01.18.pdf

The ME Association. A new study suggests that a blood test following exercise may be a very good way to differentiate between people who have ME/CFS and people who don’t.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/02/stanford-scope-exercise-elevates-blood-signature-difference-between-people-with-without-me-cfs-16-february-2018/

Article about ME in the current issue of Family Doctor – a publication produced by the New York State Academy of Family Physicians. Starts on page 23.

http://www.nysafp.org/NYSAFP/media/PDFs/Family%20Doctor/Family-Physician-Winter-2018WEB.pdf

BuzzFeed News. A senior Judge has suggested charging the government for every “no-brainer” benefits case it loses in court. Sir Ernest Ryder, senior president of tribunals, said the quality of evidence provided by the Department for Work and Pensions is so poor it would be “wholly inadmissible” in any other court.

https://www.buzzfeed.com/emilydugan/most-dwp-benefits-cases-which-reach-court-are-based-on-bad?utm_term=.vqgePgKO6#.uo3pa6Eoy

Post Sixteen. Wheelchair or Not?

I’m currently trying to decide whether or not to buy an electric wheelchair. It is however, an expensive purchase, in the thousands, so if I do, I have to be sure. The problem is, I’m not sure.

If I go for it I will first have to get over some significant emotional barriers about what this means for me. Does it mean I am ‘giving in’ to my illness? If it does, is that bad? There’s little point in pretending that I don’t have ME, that I’m not severely incapacitated by it. Will I become too dependant on it and risk deconditioning? I don’t think so. I can walk short distances and I don’t plan on using the wheelchair to get somewhere I can manage by foot, I like to use my legs when I can. So I’ll still be walking the same short, and infrequent distances as I currently do, and I had it confirmed at a recent hospital appointment that my muscles have not (yet anyway) deconditioned. Will I feel self-conscious and embarrassed to use it in public? Probably. I already feel self-conscious and embarrassed to use my walking stick. Will people treat me differently when they see me as a wheelchair user? Possibly. This article in The Pool suggests that 25 per cent of Brits find it “uncomfortable” talking to disabled people. Apparently some people feel they have nothing in common with disabled people. Will the people who once felt they had things in common with me no longer feel that way? Has my personality now reduced down to nothing but ‘chronically ill person’? To be honest I think some people already do feel that. They can’t see that despite this life-changing illness I am still the same person, with the same interests, the same morals, the same passions, the same dreams and the same goals, it’s just that my body no longer works as well as it used to. Something I struggle with is that my illness is ‘invisible’. Generally speaking I look ‘well’. There’s no way that someone who didn’t already know could look at me and know that I have a severe debilitating chronic illness/disability. So a wheelchair would solve that problem, wouldn’t it?

There are many situations that I currently avoid. On a better day I can manage the walk to the post office and back, although not without PEM (post exertional malaise). But this is based on not having to stand in a queue, and I can’t possibly know ahead of time if there is a queue or not, so I don’t risk it. A wheelchair would change this. There are also many activities that I simply cannot do, that are far too much for me, that I don’t have the energy for and that my legs wouldn’t manage. Like walking to my mum’s house, or having a wander along the High Street to visit my favourite coffee shop that is just that bit too far for me to walk (I’m talking about you Coltman’s). When I go out I might be able to stay out for longer while maintaining my energy levels. On better days I could do these things with a wheelchair. Note that this would still have be on a better day, I might have wheels but I’d still have ME, I’d still have daily widespread pain, debilitating exhaustion, dizziness, brain fog and sensory overload. Having an electric wheelchair won’t undo any of my symptoms, it will simply give me access to a higher level of mobility than I currently have. So far, I’ve begrudgingly accepted my current limitations, the fact that I’m mainly housebound, that many activities that used to be so everyday and normal for me are now off limits, I don’t like it, but it is what it is. But maybe it doesn’t have to be? With a wheelchair maybe I could regain some of my lost independence and freedom, maybe it would open my world up. If I can get past my fears and insecurities it could be wonderfully empowering.

I do however have concerns, some rational, and some possibly less so. I’m concerned about how much I will use it, will it be worth it? Like I said, the arrival of a wheelchair is not going to suddenly improve my health enough that I can start going out every day, or even every other day. What if I only get use out of it a couple of times a month, is that enough to justify the cost? I also have to think about the overall use of my already limited energy. If having a wheelchair will allow me to go out more frequently, will I actually end up using more energy on these outings, energy that I wouldn’t have used otherwise? Should I accept and stick to my limitations, remain mainly hosuebound in the hope that only prolonged rest and limited activity will allow me to recover? Maybe. But this existence has already damaged my mental health, so what will a few more years, decades, or a lifetime of this do to me?

One of my main concerns is based around the fact that I can walk short distances. I worry about what people may think, or say, when they see me get up from my wheelchair and walk. There’s a horrible meme that I’ve seen on Facebook a few times, (which unfortunately means that I have friends who have ‘liked’ or shared this meme). It’s a photo of a woman standing from her wheelchair to reach a high shelf in a supermarket. The caption reads “There’s been a miracle in the booze aisle!”, or something along those lines. It’s cruel, it’s ableist, and not in the least bit funny. I don’t want to become a meme. Some people seem to think that wheelchairs are only for those who cannot walk, at all, ever. I read The Mighty, an excellent website full of personal accounts written by people all over the world living with various illnesses and disabilities. I’d recommend it for anyone, it has aided my understanding of the vast world of illness and disability immeasurably, and couldn’t we all use a good dose of increased empathy. I come across a new post pretty much every day about people judging disabled people. Either they don’t look ‘disabled enough’ to use that parking space, despite having a Blue Badge (or the equivalent in their country), or they look ‘adequately disabled’ in their wheelchair, but then they rise from their wheelchair and their spectators think ‘my god it’s a miracle’, or more frequently, they think the person in the wheelchair is a fraud. This kind of thinking is common, far too common, I read these stories frequently. Many people judge and make assumptions, they lack the ability to consider any set of circumstance other than their own, they view disability in black and white, rather than the many shades of grey that make up the world of disability and chronic illness. I don’t want to be the person being judged for getting out of my wheelchair when I can, need or want to, and I don’t want to be the butt of anyone’s jokes, especially not when I’m already going to be feeling all sorts of self-conscious and vulnerable sitting in my wheelchair.

Of course, when I’m able to temporarily push my fears aside, when I’m thinking rationally, or when I think about how I would advise someone else, it’s a different picture altogether. I view a wheelchair like a pair of glasses. People who don’t have perfect sight wear glasses, or contacts, to aid their vision, and some people use wheelchairs to aid their mobility. It’s an aid, something to help and enhance a person’s quality of life. No one judges me for aiding my vision by wearing glasses when I use the computer or read, so maybe no one will judge me for aiding my mobility by using a wheelchair, and those who do view me differently, well, do I want them in my life? And I know I shouldn’t care what strangers think, but I do, sadly. When I’m able to think positively about this new world of mobility, I already know where I’ll go first. My favourite walk, in the valley behind my mum’s house, it’s so peaceful, the town is completely out of sight, and maybe this sounds cheesy, but it’s where I feel closest to my dad, we walked here together so many times. The wheelchair I have my eye on won’t manage the whole walk, I’d need an all-terrain, four wheel drive monster of a wheelchair to walk the full thing, but just a glimpse of the valley would be enough for me. The thought of being able to go out and not worry about how long my legs will hold me up, or whether my lightheadedness or dizziness will overwhelm me, well that thought brings me nothing but joy.

The wheelchair I’ve been eyeing up is lightweight and foldable, and of course it’s electric. I don’t have the strength in my arms to self-propel, I mean, I couldn’t even squeeze the juice out of a lemon the other day. And I don’t want to be reliant on someone pushing me, that defeats the purpose entirely. The reason I have to be absolutely certain about this is the cost, it’s incredibly expensive, around the £2,500 mark, possibly more depending on what accessories I buy, like a second battery etc. Before you ask, no, an electric wheelchair, for me, is not available on the NHS. If I want it, I have to buy it. There is however another option. Crowdfunding. It is not uncommon at all, actually it’s incredibly common, for people to crowdfund their electric wheelchair. I don’t know how I feel about this, actually I do, I feel really uncomfortable about this. I know it’s not exactly the same as a person asking for sponsorship to fund their amazing holiday to Peru so they can hike The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, under the guise of ‘charity’, but the idea of it makes me squirm all the same. So I ask you, how would you, my friends, family and readers feel about me crowdfunding my electric wheelchair? Would it be really cheeky and/or presumptuous of me?

There’s another option, I could reapply for PIP (Personal Independence Payment), a benefit that helps with the extra costs of a long-term health condition or disability, it’s the one that is gradually replacing DLA (Disability Living Allowance). I did apply for this a couple of years ago, I attended the horrendous face-to-face assessment, the assessor lied in his report (for example, he claimed that I made my own way to the assessment centre, even though my mum drove me, which he knew, he gave her a form to claim back her petrol expenses) and the DWP turned me down. Despite the fact that more than half of PIP decisions are changed after mandatory reconsideration or an appeal to a tribunal, I didn’t fight it, I simply didn’t have the energy. I also felt that I could manage without PIP, I had my ESA (Employment Support Allowance) and the rental income from my flat (minus the letting agency fee, mortgage, insurance etc), so I wasn’t feeling hugely driven to challenge the result. Something really annoying though, I really could use a Blue Badge, which means when I go to the GP, or to the hospital, or anywhere that has designated disabled parking, my mum could park there. But, in the region in which I live (Scottish Borders), I can’t apply for a Blue Badge without first receiving PIP. So, to get a Blue Badge, I would need to reapply for a benefit that I don’t really need, then apply for the Blue Badge. It’s ridiculous. But actually, the more I think about it, I could use PIP. It would take time to save up, but it could pay for my wheelchair, it could pay for the expensive experimental treatments that I currently cannot afford, acupuncture for my chronic migraines, for example. It could pay for my counselling (currently paid for by a kind benefactor), it could pay for my supplements and my private prescription for Low Dose Naltrexone. The more I think about it, my illness/disability does incur many costs, having ME is expensive, and that is exactly what PIP is for. But do I have it in me to go through the traumatic (no exaggeration) application process again? I don’t know. My mental health is fragile, and the DWP are certainly capable of pushing me over the edge.

One of my biggest bugbears in life is unsolicited advice, people advising me when I haven’t asked for advice. But I am now asking for advice, your advice is very much solicited. What should I do? What would you do? Should I feel self-conscious? I know you’ll say I shouldn’t, I guess what I really mean is, can you understand why I will feel self-conscious? Can you empathise with me? Have you ever had judgemental thoughts about someone who can walk short distances using a wheelchair? Did you laugh at that internet meme? Do you think it means I’m giving in to my illness? Do you think it will hinder my recovery? How should I pay for it? Can I crowdfund this without people thinking “cheeky cow, pay for your own mobility aids!”? Should I put myself through the harrowing process of applying for PIP which will undoubtedly end up at a tribunal (most do)? Or, could it be one of the best possible things I could do for myself? I just don’t know. I really don’t.

Update: The day after I published this I had a moment of clarity regarding the fears that are holding me back. You can read about this here… Post Sixteen Continued… Wheelchair Or Not. An Afterword.