Post Thirty. General Update – The Latest On My ME.

This has been a year of many referrals to specialists, which has resulted in a lot of hospital appointments. These referrals have all been made in an effort to find a way to manage some of my individual symptoms, and to rule out any cause, other than ME. I am very lucky that I have a GP who likes to see me every six weeks or so, and who takes my symptoms seriously. The previous GP’s and specialists I saw always brushed off any new or worsening symptoms as part of my ME. This of course is very likely, but it won’t necessarily always be the case, and we won’t know unless we investigate. This dismissiveness is what caused the delay in my Endometriosis diagnosis, and what put a halt to the bladder investigations. I hate to think that I could have had something more sinister going on, but, because of this attitude that many doctors hold about ME, it wouldn’t have been diagnosed until my autopsy! So I’m very grateful for my GP, I can always trust that she will take me and my symptoms seriously. 

With all these referrals and various other things going on this year, I haven’t been well enough to individually update all the people who are regularly in contact with me, so again I decided to write a general update here, for those who are interested. It’s an exciting adventure from my brain and spinal cord, via my bladder and uterus, to my hands and my feet!

Neurology

I saw my Neurologist again in November, the first appointment since I received my brain and spinal cord MRI scan results. When I first saw this Neurologist in May he said my symptoms were indicative of ME, and/or Multiple Sclerosis (MS). So the purpose of the scans was to confirm or rule out MS, and I guess to see if there was anything else visible that could explain my neurological symptoms. Well, as I kind of expected, my scans showed no abnormalities. So MS has now been ruled out, again.

I don’t know how I feel about that. Life with a MS diagnosis would be easier than life with a ME diagnosis, simply in terms of how each illness is regarded by other people. If I had MS, I would still be very unwell, but I could ‘just’ be unwell. I wouldn’t have to spend my time and energy educating people and putting right their misconceptions. But, if I had been diagnosed with MS, instead of ME, what would I do with my time? Currently the main that keeps me going – through the pain, the uncertainty, the loss, the grief, the isolation, the loneliness, the depression – is ME advocacy. I’m so invested in fighting for health equality for people with ME, what would I have done if I’d found out that I didn’t have ME? Ditch the ME advocacy and turn to MS advocacy? Except, MS doesn’t need the advocacy, not like ME does (MS, despite there being fewer than half the amount of people with MS than people with ME, gets considerably more funding for research). I expect I wouldn’t have been able to abandon my ME advocacy efforts, not now that I know what people with ME have to contend with – the misconceptions, the abuse, the neglect, the mockery, the lack of care, treatment and respect, and the chronic lack of both funding for biomedical research, and education for medical professionals. So, I would have been a person with MS, but advocating for people with ME, I would also have had to rename my blog, which would’ve been a pain in the bum, so I guess there is a silver lining in being stuck with ME.

I got to see my brain and spinal cord MRI scans, which was fascinating. I hadn’t realised just how tail-like the very end of the spine looks. Apart from a few signs of normal ageing, everything looks healthy. In fact, he saw fewer signs of ageing than he would have expected. So, I’m the most unwell I have ever been, I’m barely functional, but my brain (structurally) looks completely healthy. This was noted after my first brain scan in 2015 too, that it was an unusually healthy looking brain. Apparently most people have a few lesions, and above a certain number, it would be indicative of MS – I have none. My mum and I were discussing this after my appointment. Maybe the reason my brain isn’t ageing as would be expected is because of my ME brain fog, I do less thinking, and as a result, my brain looks younger! But I think it’s probably just down to luck, maybe genetics, who knows. I find it quite frustrating. On paper I’m the healthiest person ever, but in reality, my body is malfunctioning left, right and centre. I feel like I’m very slowly dying.

The most useful bit of the appointment was getting a name for my newest symptom, Myoclonic Seizures (non-epileptic seizures). They are fairly common in ME, especially severe ME, I believe, which makes sense given the neurological component of ME. There’s nothing I can do about them though, and unless I ever lose consciousness when it happens, they aren’t really anything to be concerned about. He did ask if I can try and record it on my phone the next time it happens, which I think might be a bit tricky.

Basically there’s nothing more he can do now. But I can arrange another appointment with him if I want to, to discuss worsening and/or new symptoms, or if I just want to speak to him about anything specific/neurology related. Given how most Neurologists treat people with ME, and my awful first encounter with a Neurologist in 2015, I think I’ve been pretty lucky this time.

Urology

I saw a new Urologist this year as well, which was prompted by the sudden worsening of my bladder symptoms in February. I had previously been diagnosed with Overactive Bladder Syndrome (OBS), but I was never quite convinced, the symptoms just didn’t match. The new Urologist seemed to agree with me, and said there was a test they could do which would confirm or rule out OBS, and again, the results came back normal, so I think that means the OBS was a misdiagnosis. Why the first Urologist I saw in 2014 didn’t do this test, I don’t know.

This doctor was also interested in the results of my MRI scan, specifically of the spinal cord, but again there was nothing visible in the scans that could be the cause of my bladder symptoms. So we’ve pretty much concluded that my bladder symptoms are simply ME symptoms, and the only chance of them improving, is if my ME as a whole improves.

The Urologist, in an effort to do something helpful, did refer me to a bladder nurse (that’s probably not her official title) who visited me at home. She asked me lots of questions about my diet and water intake etc, and said there are no improvements needed in that department, my diet is as healthy as can be. She asked if I had ever made notes of what I eat and when, to see if I notice a pattern in my bladder symptoms. I have already done this, and the only clear trigger is chilli. Since early/mid- 2014 I have not been able to eat chilli in any form – no fresh chilli, dried chilli flakes, chilli powder or paprika etc. Of all the food I am now intolerant to, thanks to ME, this is the most upsetting. I love chilli. I miss spicy food far more than I do alcohol, which I have also had to give up. I can tolerate pepper though, and I find white pepper to be the best substitute for chilli. Black pepper offers more flavour, but white pepper has more heat.

So, the bladder nurse left having told me that there’s very little she can offer me. As a last ditch attempt, she did suggest I start doing regular pelvic floor exercises again. I did do these back when I saw the first Urologist, and it didn’t help, but I thought it could be worth giving the exercises another shot. However, it turns out that pelvic floor exercises now cause me pain and in fact trigger my bladder symptoms, which is what I experience when I use tampons. I mentioned this to my GP (I had a forty five minute appointment with her a few days ago, to get through my mammoth list of maladies), and she told me to stop doing them. So that’s that. My bladder doesn’t like having ME.

Gynaecology 

Also this year, I was referred back to the Gynaecologist I saw in 2016, the same one who diagnosed my Endometriosis (the first Gynaecologist I saw in 2015 refused to investigate for Endometriosis as she believed those symptoms were ME symptoms). I mentioned in my last General Update post that I was considering Endometrial Ablation. This is the removal of the endometrium, or, the lining of the uterus. The purpose is to reduce the amount of blood loss during my period, or eliminate it altogether. It can only be done on women who either don’t want to have children, or don’t want any more children, because, while technically pregnancy can occur, it would be dangerous, and most likely result in miscarriage. Thankfully my doctor trusts that I know my own mind, and believes me when I tell him I don’t want to have children, and he agreed it would be a good solution for me. I had it done at the beginning of November.

It is often performed under a local anaesthetic, and that was what I initially wanted, thinking it would be gentler on my ME, but the doctor advised I go for a general anaesthetic. He said that even with a local, and pain relief, I would find it incredibly painful, specifically, the forceful dilation of the cervix, which they need to do to access the uterus, in order to burn the lining off, and he advised that anyone who hasn’t already experienced this (dilation) through childbirth, should go for a general. He said the intense heat from the actual burning off of the lining would be very unpleasant too, and that was the bit that actually changed my mind, also, my ME actually didn’t react too badly after my last two generals, so I chose the general and hoped for the best.

On the day of the surgery (well, it isn’t really surgery, given no incisions are made, but you know what I mean) I had to arrive at the BGH (Borders General Hospital) at 7.30am, which, due to my ME induced wonky sleep schedule, is the middle of the night for me. It meant my mum had to pick me up at 6.30am, and because I wasn’t allowed to drink anything after 5.30am, I got up at 5.25am so I could quickly take my morning meds with a glass of water. The early start was what I was dreading most about the day. I’m often unable to move and lift myself up for a while after I wake up (a ME symptom, it’s like a temporary paralysis), so when I have to get up at a certain time to make an appointment, to be sure I’ll actually manage to get out of bed in time, I need to set my alarm for one to three hours before I need to get up. I went for one hour on this occasion, which meant I woke up at 4.30am. I also rarely get to sleep before 1am, and on this night it was closer to 2.30am, so I went to hospital on two hours sleep. This early start however did give me something that I had been missing for the last four years, without really realising I’d been missing it. On the drive to the hospital, I saw the sunrise! It wasn’t the best sunrise I’d ever seen, but it was still pretty great. Living in such isolation, I’d kind of forgotten that the world is still turning.

I was the first surgery of the day, so thankfully I didn’t have to wait too long beforehand. I was wheeled along at 9am-ish, woke up at 10.08am, and I was discharged around 2.30pm. Overall, the actual being in hospital wasn’t as bad an experience as previous times. I don’t often experience this, but the nursing staff really took care of me. I felt like they always had it at the forefront of their minds that I wasn’t just a surgery day-patient, I was a ME patient too. They really did their best to make sure I was comfortable. Just being in hospital for a few hours, the early start and the drive there and back meant it was a huge day for me, in terms of ME, and far more than I can safely manage, meaning, without having a huge crash afterwards. So in these situations I always appreciate when the nursing staff try to mitigate any factors that could make it even worse for me, in this case, making sure I was in the quietest bit of the unit. When I had my tonsils removed in 2017, this did not happen. 

I’ve had five surgeries/general anaesthetics in my life, two were pre-ME, and the other three all since I’ve had ME. Something I’ve noticed with my last two anaesthetics, plus this one, is that I seem to feel remarkably well, in terms of my ME, for the rest of the day (of the operation), it continues through the following day, but the next again day I feel worse, and I continue to feel terrible until the crash wears off. It makes me think that there’s something in the drugs they gave me for the anaesthetic that helps my ME, and as the anaesthetic wears off, thirty six hours or so later, I then begin to feel the effects of the over-exertion and the surgery. When I say I feel remarkably well in the hours after the surgery, I don’t mean that I feel as well as can be expected for someone with ME who’s just had an operation, I mean, I feel better than I do even on my ‘normal’ ME days. Obviously I feel the effects of whatever the surgery was, in this case I had lower abdominal/pelvic pain, but it’s almost like my ME improves in the hours immediately after the anaesthetic. This makes me wonder, if I’m not imagining it, which of the drugs is it, and, would it be possible to be given a daily low dose of whatever drug it is? What is also really strange, is that, since having ME I’m usually so intolerant to medications, even really mild stuff, I tend to get all the side effects, and severely, so how does my body tolerate powerful anaesthesia drugs? 

I heard another theory recently, that people with ME recover from anaesthesia faster than other people. Or perhaps it would be more accurate to say, we ‘feel’ like we recover from anaesthesia faster. We’re used to feeling unwell, so, while a non-ME person will feel rough after an anaesthetic, people with ME just feel ‘normal’, because we always feel rough. I have no idea how accurate this is, but it is an interesting idea.

But anyway, after the effects of the anaesthetic wore off I did crash, badly, and I’m still not quite back to how I was beforehand. But this was to be expected given how full-on that day was. It’s too soon to tell how well the ablation has worked as it takes a few months to settle. I have had a period since the procedure, and while the bleeding has been minimal (which is good), it’s lasting longer (seventeen days so far, my norm is six/seven days), and it has been very painful, at times more so than my pre-ablation periods. I’m hoping it’s because my uterus is still healing, the inside of it is still an open raw wound, so having a period in a not yet healed burnt out uterus is bound to be painful, I imagine.

Oh, and one more thing, after the sunrise, the next best bit of the day was during my pre-op chat with the anaesthetist. While discussing my odds of a swift recovery from the anaesthetic, she said something along the lines of… “you don’t drink alcohol, you don’t smoke, you’re slim…” !!! She said I was slim! This may be rather superficial, but staying in control of my weight has been difficult since having ME, and is a source of anxiety for me. I can’t exercise, so diet is the only tool I have to manage my weight. Thankfully, I genuinely love eating the diet that I do. Giving up animals, animal products, refined carbs and refined sugars is not a hardship for me. I don’t count calories, I really don’t care what the calorie content is of the food I eat, I care more about knowing that everything I do eat, is doing me good. I also only eat two meals per day, partly because I’m only out of bed for ten hours each day, so I can’t fit in three meals, I also don’t have the energy to prepare three meals per day, and my appetite is smaller now, perhaps because I’m less active. Also, because I fit my two meals into a ten hour window, I spend at least fourteen hours per day not eating. This means that I am inadvertently following an intermittent fasting diet. Apparently going fourteen hours without food and having a ten hour eating window is the new trend in intermittent fasting. I don’t know if there’s any validity in this, but if there is, maybe that’s helping me control my weight too. So, anyway, given I always feel a bit on the podgy side, it was nice to be described as slim, and in a factual/medical way, not as a compliment by someone desperate to appease me. 

Hands

Have I mentioned this before? I can’t remember. I’ve been having some issues with my hands since late last year. Almost every day, usually late at night, my fingers and palms turn red and feel burny hot, it’s incredibly painful. It often happens when I’m trying to go to sleep, but the burny hotness prevents me from getting to sleep. I have to be touching something cold to get relief from the pain. So I try to get comfy, with my head on the pillow and my hands pressed against the cold walls. After a while, the same thing was happening with my hands, they go red and burny, but a finger or two turns waxy white and feels icy cold. It’s very odd, but I can at least press the icy cold fingers against the burny hot bits to cool them down. My feet are a bit weird too, they go red, or purple, or one goes red and the other goes white, but when it happens to my feet it isn’t painful.

My GP and I went back and forth between Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS) and Raynaud’s Disease, both conditions in their own right, and also both quite common in combination with ME. I tried some medication for MCAS, a high dose antihistamine, but it didn’t help, which is what made us settle on Raynaud’s, but I think there may be a bit of both going on. I could try a blood pressure medication to help with Raynaud’s, but my GP doesn’t advise it, given the side effects, which would exacerbate my ME symptoms and make me feel worse in general.

However! I have been getting acupuncture treatments since the start of the year for migraines and general ME stuff. After it seemed like Raynaud’s was the most likely culprit for my hands, I asked my acupuncture man if he thought acupuncture could help. He went away and did some research, and found that there are specific acupuncture points for treating Raynaud’s, in the palms of my hands. So, as well as the needles in my feet, front of my hands and head, since September I’ve had one in each palm too. I have no idea how it works, I can’t even say if I really believe it works, because I don’t understand it, it doesn’t seem like it should work, but somehow it does seem to work. Maybe acupuncture is a placebo therapy, or maybe there really is something to it, but honestly, I don’t really care. Since we started using the Raynaud’s specific points, the burny hot and icy cold hands/fingers still happen, but not as frequently, and when it does happen, it doesn’t last as long, rarely for more than thirty minutes, whereas before, it would be almost every day, and for a few hours at a time. I didn’t make any other changes at this time, unless it’s a total coincidence, it surely must be the acupuncture.

Post Exertional Malaise (PEM), Post Exertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion (PENE) and Mental Health

*Apologies for all the upcoming acronyms, I know it makes for more difficult reading, especially for people with ME/brain fog. It certainly muddled my head while writing this section, but it was marginally easier/less muddled than writing the full names each time. 

If you’re a regular reader, or someone who has ME, you’ll know that the defining symptom of ME is the abnormal response to exertion. It’s not, as is often reported, fatigue. In fact, you don’t even need the symptom of fatigue to be diagnosed with ME.

This abnormal response to exertion is most often referred to as Post Exertional Malaise (PEM). Malaise however, which means “a general feeling of being under the weather”, is a dreadful word, and is so not descriptive of the symptom. I have always used the term PEM though, and I’ve mentioned it a lot in my blog, but I’m thinking of moving away from this. I don’t believe it’s very helpful. Along with the names Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and the newer name that some organisations are trying to foist upon us, Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID), I don’t think it does people with ME any favours. Rather, it may be aiding the misconceptions that exist about ME. So, I think I might start using the more accurate, Post Exertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion (PENE). And yes, I know pene is Spanish for penis –  that is unfortunate.

PENE is the term used in the International Consensus Criteria (ICC), the most thorough and up to date ME criteria, which I shared in Post Seven. Below I have shared the descriptions of both PEM and PENE. This was taken from a document created by the charity ME Advocacy, comparing ME as defined by the ICC, and as defined by the Institute of Medicine (IOM – but now known as the National Academy of Medicine).

The IOM criteria of ME, or as they call it, ME/CFS aka SEID, is lacking in comparison to the ICC. It’s vaguer, and as a result it will include people with illnesses that are not ME, and this is problematic. It risks watering down ME research if the people recruited to participate don’t all have ME. The ICC is simply more descriptive of the illness, and I believe it should be the only ME criteria – for diagnostic, educational and research purposes.

Post Exertional Malaise (PEM)

PEM is worsening of a patient’s symptoms and function after exposure to physical or cognitive stressors that were normally tolerated before disease onset. Subjective reports of PEM and prolonged recovery are supported by objective evidence in the scientific literature, including failure to normally reproduce exercise test results (2 day cardiopulmonary exercise test) and impaired cognitive function after exertion. There is sufficient evidence that PEM is a primary feature that helps distinguish ME/CFS (SEID) from other conditions.

Frequency and severity of symptoms should be assessed. The diagnosis of ME/CFS (SEID) should be questioned if patients do not have these symptoms at least half of the time with moderate, substantial, or severe intensity.

Post Exertional Neuroimmune Exhaustion (PENE)

This cardinal feature is a pathological inability to produce sufficient energy on demand with prominent symptoms primarily in the neuroimmune regions.

Characteristics are:

  1. Marked, rapid physical and/or cognitive fatigability in response to exertion, which may be minimal such as activities of daily living or simple mental tasks, can be debilitating and cause a relapse.
  2. Post-exertional symptom exacerbation: e.g. acute flu-like symptoms, pain and worsening of other symptoms.
  3. Post-exertional exhaustion may occur immediately after activity or be delayed by hours or days.
  4. Recovery period is prolonged, usually taking 24 hours or longer. A relapse can last days, weeks or longer.
  5. Low threshold of physical and mental fatigability (lack of stamina) results in a substantial reduction in pre-illness activity level.

For a diagnosis of ME, symptom severity must result in a significant reduction of a patient’s premorbid activity level.

What I might do for now, so as not to confuse folks, is refer to it as PEM/PENE, and maybe one day I’ll drop the PEM completely.

I brought this up because my own PEM/PENE has been a lot worse this year. I wish I could learn from this, and I can to some extent, but due to the delayed onset, it’s incredibly difficult to measure. I can never quite know what causes my crashes. When I feel myself starting to crash, I always wonder what caused it – was it my shower the night before, my lack of sleep that night, or my GP appointment two days ago? There’s no way of knowing. I can repeat those activities, to try and find a pattern, but the results will vary. What makes it more complicated is that I often seem to have shorter term crashes going on within my longer term crashes – crashes upon crashes!

I’m still in a long term crash (maybe relapse is the better word here) from my Iceland trip last December. This means that I’ve manged far less activity this year than previous years. Last year, I could still go out for the occasional coffee, maybe once every two months – not anymore, the last time I went out for coffee was December last year. I can now only leave my home for medical and counselling appointments, and for very rare short outings with my mum, usually for a drive. All of these outings cause me to crash, but I have to weigh up the benefits. Having regular support from my GP and counsellor, and getting outside for fresh air and a change of scenery every few months is vital for my mental health.

While I’ve been in my Iceland relapse, I’ve also had a lot of other things going on, all of which have contributed to my decline this year. The summer heatwave and the many months I have had to dedicate to working on my PIP application and my ESA renewal (disability benefits) have been a huge factor. It’s been an emotionally difficult year too. There was that thing with the cat (see Post Twenty Nine). Also, in July this year some of my relatives from the States and Canada came to Scotland for a family reunion. I saw them all briefly, and it was lovely to see/meet them (three second cousins who I haven’t seen since 1988 – one of them was the first baby I ever held!), but it was also very difficult for me not being able to take part in the family dinners and day trips. While it always makes me feel sad, I usually handle these things ok. I know that life has to go on around me, I can’t ban everyone I know from living until/if I’m well enough to join in again, but this was a particularly difficult one. 

An inevitable consequence of my ME worsening this year, is that I’ve generally felt a lot more isolated. I haven’t been well enough to socialise and interact with people as much I would like, or need to. I do have a handful of people who, in lieu of seeing me in person (due to geography or lack of time), do keep in regular contact with me. These are the people who understand and accept my limitations and don’t expect more from me than I can offer. So many people have disappeared from my life since having ME, so the ones who have stuck around are invaluable to me. I still grieve for the people I’ve lost, and I try not to be angry with them, but I can’t help but feel hurt. Not everyone is built to handle chronic illness and disability. They can’t cope when their previously healthy friends suddenly have different abilities, needs and priorities, they don’t know how to deal with it, so they distance themselves from it. 

The other consequence of my continuing/worsening ME and the isolation, is the decline in my mental health, which I am still struggling with, both the depression and anxiety. At the moment I feel I can handle the depression slightly better than the anxiety. I am, at times, not all the time, able to distract myself when I’m feeling low in mood. But I find the anxiety is harder to ignore. The nervous dread that I feel, the panic and the constant feeling afraid, of everything and of nothing in particular, is crippling. I’ve said before that I liken this to the feeling I had when waking from a nightmare as a child. But now, it’s a permanent fixture within my life. I’m hoping that this will ease as/if I can gain more control of my life. I have some changes to make and things to do, all of which I will get into next year. 

I think that’s it

As far as I can remember, I think that’s us pretty much up to speed. What I haven’t covered in detail is my PIP application or my ESA renewal, and I also want to tell you about what’s going on in the wider world of ME, from the NICE guidelines review for the treatment of ME (The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence – they provide guidelines for the NHS), to my own personal advocacy efforts. But there’s so much to say that these really merit posts of their own, which I’ll hopefully get round to soon, ish. 

 

NEWS

The Sunday Times. How it feels to… be exhausted 24 hours a day.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/how-it-feels-to-be-exhausted-24-hours-a-day-28cx59bn9

Simmaron Research. Immune Study Adds to Evidence Of Body-Wide Problems With Energy Production in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS).

http://simmaronresearch.com/2018/11/immune-study-evidence-energy-production-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

Simmaron Research. Could “Junk DNA” Be Causing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome / Myalgic Encephalomyelitis?

http://simmaronresearch.com/2018/11/junk-dna-causing-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-myalgic-encephalomyelitis/

Stonebird. Severe ME : What You Don’t Say, What You Don’t See.

http://stonebird.co.uk/WYC/index.html

Health Rising. Workwell’s Two-Day Exercise Tests and Breaking the Deconditioning Dilemma in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS).

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/11/19/workwell-cpet-deconditioning-dilemma-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs/

Simmaron Research. Could Crippled Herpesviruses Be Contributing to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) and Other Diseases?

http://simmaronresearch.com/2018/11/crippled-herpesviruses-contributing-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-mecfs-diseases/

Health Rising. Anaerobic Thresholds, Fatty Acid Problems and Autophagy: Dr. Klimas’s Exercise Study.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/11/15/anaerobic-thresholds-fatty-acid-problems-and-autophagy-dr-klimass-exercise-study/

Health Rising. Free Six-Part Online ME/CFS / FM Video Series From the Bateman Horne Center Begins.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/11/09/online-me-cfs-fm-fibromyalgia-video-bateman-horne-center/

Health Rising. Are “Old” Muscles Holding People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Down? Plus Tompkins’ Team Promises New Insights.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/11/07/muscles-old-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-tompkins/https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/11/07/muscles-old-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-tompkins/

Bateman Horne Centre. Cutting Edge Technology for ME/CFS Biomarker Discovery.

https://batemanhornecenter.org/accelerating-research/

Not The Science Bit. The Triumph of Eminence-Based Medicine.

https://notthesciencebit.net/2018/11/03/the-triumph-of-eminence-based-medicine/

Health Rising. ME/CFS, Naviaux’s Cell Danger Response and a Nervous System Under Threat.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/10/29/me-cfs-naviaux-cell-danger-response-freezing-nervous-system-threat/

BBC News. ME and chronic fatigue: ‘Some doctors don’t believe you’re sick’.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-45954552

Health Rising. The Metabolic Trap Shines During the Symposium on the Molecular Basis of ME/CFS at Stanford.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/10/18/the-metabolic-trap-shines-during-the-symposium-on-the-molecular-basis-of-me-cfs-at-stanford/

Health Rising. GET Paper Withdrawal Shocks CBT/GET Proponents – Emboldens ME/CFS Advocates.

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/10/20/get-paper-withdrawal-shocks-cbt-get-proponents-emboldens-me-cfs-advocates/

Sage Journals. Graded exercise therapy for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome is not effective and unsafe. Re-analysis of a Cochrane review.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2055102918805187

CNN. Indie pop sensation’s disease became his muse.

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/10/05/health/chronic-fatigue-stuart-murdoch-belle-sebastian-turning-points/index.html

Simmaron Research. Could the Brain’s Mast Cells Be Causing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)?

https://sable.madmimi.com/c/16005?id=2732257.9403.1.5b43278c3d7ba2fa12d3bcc50d542c6b

Health Rising. Invasion: The Source of the Neuroinflammation in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/09/25/invasion-neuroinflammation-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

Health Rising. Brain on Fire: Widespread Neuroinflammation Found in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS).

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/09/24/brain-fire-neuroinflammation-found-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs/

 

Post Twenty Five. General Update – The Last Three Months.

I haven’t posted for a while and I couldn’t decide which of my partially written posts I should complete first, so I decided to start with a general update, to let you know what’s been going on in my life the past few months. One of the benefits of my blog, I’ve discovered, is it saves me energy when I communicate with friends, we don’t have to begin the ‘what have you been up to’ conversation from scratch, if they’ve read my blog. So if I write regular general updates, this will update everyone (who’s interested) in one go, and save me from having to have the same conversation over and over again.

The reason that I haven’t posted anything since February is that I’ve had a really bad few months. My trip to Iceland (see Post Twenty Three. Wheelchair’s First Holiday.) and my screening of Unrest (see Post Twenty Four. Unrest In Peebles.) caused me to relapse. Four months later and I’m still not back to my pre-Iceland levels of ME. I’m managing much less, and I already couldn’t do much, and it takes far less exertion to cause me to crash these days. So I haven’t managed to write much on here, not on top of feeding myself, cleaning myself, getting to counselling and the doctor, which have had to be my priorities.

Mental Health

I also had a huge dip in my depression and anxiety a couple of months ago. I was experiencing frequent panic attacks, I had a constant sense of fear, my mood was incredibly low, and it was having a huge impact on my ME symptoms. I’ve been on and off anti-depressants since 2016, trying to find something that I don’t react badly to (I’m extremely sensitive to medications since having ME). In September last year I started a new one, Bupropion. My GP and I decided I would stay on the lowest dose for a few months before increasing, to give my body time to get used to it. It was during this especially difficult period a couple of months ago that we decided, in the hope it would help me through it, to increase the Bupropion dosage. Unfortunately though, in order to increase the Bupropion, I had to stop taking Amitriptyline, also technically an anti-depressant, but I take it at a low dose as a migraine preventative. The two interact when either are taken at a higher dosage, but due to the severity of my depression at this time, I decided I had to try.

So I phased out the Amitriptyline, and then increased the Bupropion. I knew I would experience the side effects of increasing the Bupropion, I did when I first started it, and the first two weeks both times were absolute hell. As the side effects of the increased Bupropion dosage wore off, I began to realise just how much the Amitriptyline had been doing for me. I already knew how effective it was at reducing the frequency of my migraines, from two or three per week, to two per month. I hoped it wouldn’t happen, but when I stopped, the almost daily migraines returned. It always takes me a few days to recover from a migraine, and when they occur this close together, I basically never have a day off, so I spent a few weeks feeling constantly migrainey. I also stopped sleeping, I did suspect that Amitriptyline helped me sleep, but I guess I’d forgotten, it turns out, in combination with another couple of supplements, it’s essential for me.

One of the benefits I hadn’t known about was how it appeared to help me during my period. Since having ME, I developed Endometriosis (a common occurrence for women with ME), and my period went from being pretty average, to being the most dreaded, painful and generally worst week of the month. Each period caused my ME to relapse, all my ME symptoms worsened considerably. My period itself also became heavier, far far more painful with utterly debilitating cramps (ten out of ten on the pain scale), it made me nauseous and dizzy, and my bladder and guts would join the party too, it was horrendous all round, and I was looking at a possible hysterectomy. But then, thanks to a combination of meds and supplements, it became far more manageable, nowhere near my pre-ME periods, but a lot better. So I was not prepared for my first period after stopping Amitryptyline to be the worst one of my life so far. As well as the worsening of my ME symptoms, migraines, nausea etc, I had cramps so bad that they caused me to double over in agony while walking down the stairs, and resulted in me falling down the stairs, thankfully I wasn’t hurt as I was near the bottom anyway. I decided immediately that I wanted the Amitriptyline back.

So I’m now back on my usual dose of Amitryptyline, 25mg does it for me. Which of course meant I had to either drop back to the lower Bupropion dose, or stop it altogether. I decided to stop altogether, it wasn’t doing anything for me at the lower dose, so there was no point staying on it. I’ve now been back at my normal Amitriptyline dose for two weeks, and have only had one almost-migraine since, the longest I went with no migraine during those horrible few weeks was three days. After much discussion, my GP and I have come to the conclusion that due to my sensitivity to meds, I’m done with anti-depressants, the side effects are too severe, and they mess with my other meds, and none that I have tried so far have worked. So that’s that. I have Diazepam for when my anxiety gets really severe, but when it comes to depression I’m going to have to deal with it unmedicated, which terrifies me, because I fear that it could kill me. But there’s nothing more I can do, other than continue with counselling, keep trying to find things to look forward to, and keep fighting for ME health equality.

An Upsetting Discovery

I wrote in a previous post (Post Eleven. From Healthy To Not Healthy.) about a doctor I saw at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh in 2015…

I saw the ME/Infectious Diseases doctor at the Western General in mid-May. I suppose, being honest, he didn’t really have much in the way of new or useful information for me, but, he listened to me. He gave me an hour and a half to talk. I don’t think I can put into words how good it felt to finally have a medical professional with a knowledge of ME actually listen to me, and believe me, to show me understanding and compassion. We went through my entire medical, and life history. We also bonded over a love of Icelandic music! He too confirmed my diagnosis of ME. All he could have suggested was that I attend the Astley Ainslie ME Service, which I had already been referred to so there was really nothing more he could do. But he helped me enormously, like I said, he was the first example of a doctor who truly believed me and who acknowledged what a devastating and life-changing illness ME is. I really don’t think anyone can understand the importance of this, not until you’ve been there yourself.

In February I discovered something really shocking and upsetting. You’ll have to have some understanding of the PACE Trial in order to understand this, (see my previous post Post Seventeen. The PACE Trial Scandal.). I found out that the doctor I saw, the doctor who I praised, was a co-author of the PACE Trial, he ran the Scottish leg of the Trial. Despite all the evidence to the contrary, this doctor strongly believes that ME is a psychosomatic illness. He believes that we, people with ME, simply ‘believe’ that we have a physiological illness. From speaking to other patients of his, it seems he does take us seriously, and he does want to alleviate unnecessary suffering, he believes ME is a real illness, he believes that we suffer, but he does not believe that ME is a neuro-immune illness, he believes it’s a psychiatric condition. He believes that we have ‘false illness beliefs’, that we simply have a fear of exercise, and that we can overcome these beliefs with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), then we can undergo Graded Exercise Therapy (GET), and recover.

I was shocked when I heard, but all I had to do was Google his name to find proof, I also found some deeply troubling papers that he had written about ME. This man is partially responsible for the NHS treating ME as a psychosomatic disorder, despite the fact that ME is defined as Neurological by the World Health Organisation. How he, and his colleagues can do this, in the face of current research that proves that people with ME have specific defects at a cellular level (plus other science stuff I don’t understand), I just don’t know. I don’t know what his agenda is.

When I met him, I had no idea that from his point of view, I was a psychiatric patient. I felt like he believed me, that’s why I heaped so much praise on him, but seemingly, he only believed, that I believed, that I had a ‘real/physical illness’. So when we spoke, was he simply playing along, indulging my so called fantasy? I feel manipulated. I can only assume that he never brought up his psychosomatic model of ME during our appointment because he knew I had already been referred to Astley Aisnlie Hospital, and assumed they would use CBT and GET to treat me – they did not. They did use CBT, but as a tool to help me cope with my life-changing diagnosis, and I stated at my first appointment that I would not take part in GET, and they were fine with that.

I found this out in February, and I’m still reeling from it. He was nice to me, he treated me kindly, he was charming. But there’s no hiding from the truth now, his professional stance is completely behind the psychological model that states ME is not a physical illness, and that our symptoms could be removed if we wanted it enough. From now on I will research every doctor I see, so I won’t make the same mistake again.

Snow Days

We had some wonderfully snowy weather at the beginning of March. While other people had to deal with closed schools and blocked roads, I just stayed cosy in my cottage and admired the view out the window and wished I was well enough to go out and play in it. Something funny though, I had a few people ask me if I was ok, if I was managing ok being stuck inside due to the snow. This was really kind, it’s nice to be remembered, but, for me, the snow made no difference, at all. I’m always stuck indoors. I have been since mid-2015, when my ME worsened and made me mainly housebound. I was no more stuck inside with the snow, than I am when there’s no snow. But I rarely get asked how I cope with being stuck indoors when it’s ‘just’ due to my illness. Interesting.

Acupuncture

I have wanted to to try acupuncture for a while. I’m not normally one for alternative therapies, but I felt that the anecdotal evidence for acupuncture in the treatment of migraines was strong enough to give it a shot.

Initially I had hoped I could get this treatment on the NHS. It’s not something I would have normally considered (getting on the NHS), except I had read the Scottish Good Practice Statement on ME. These are the guidelines that NHS Scotland use for the treatment of ME, and they actively recommend acupuncture as a treatment for migraines in people with ME. So I asked my GP, and she contacted NHS Borders to ask if this is something they would fund. They would not, unless I attended the pain management programme at the BGH (Borders General Hospital) Pain Clinic.

I actually met with one of the Pain Clinic doctors early-2017 and he told me that the only thing he could offer me was this ten week, weekly, pain management programme. I would have to attend an exercise based workshop once a week at the BGH. He was actually fairly well informed about ME, and he advised that this course would be unsuitable for me, due to the exercise based approach, and the fact that I’d have to make the journey to the BGH every week for ten weeks, which is just not do-able for me. He also told me that acupuncture was not available on the NHS, this was before I had read the Scottish Good Practice Statement, and I believed him.

So, NHS Borders have denied me funding for an officially recommended treatment, that could help me, unless I attend a course that would cause me harm, a course that I was advised not to do by the actual doctor who runs it. Bonkers, I know.

After finding funding for it elsewhere, I then began my search for a private acupuncturist who could do home visits. I found someone from Borders Chiropractic and he comes to my home every Monday. It’s too soon, and there have been too many variables (on and off Amitriptyline, Bupropion etc) the last couple of months, to say if it’s having an effect. I do find the actual appointment very relaxing, and twice so far I have spent the rest of the day (after the appointment) feeling better than I have for ages. I want to give it at least six months before I make my evaluation.

Blue Badge

In the last couple of months I successfully applied for a Blue Badge, which means I (my mum, me as the passenger) can now use designated disabled parking spaces. I hardly go anywhere, so it won’t get used much, but it’s really useful for hospital appointments. The BGH is huge (as are most hospitals), and every appointment involves too much walking, so now I don’t go without my wheelchair. Having the extra space around the car for folding and unfolding my wheelchair is great, I can faff around without worrying about being hit by a car, that’s always a good thing. Of course being able to park close to the hospital also helps with my overall energy usage. The process of getting the Blue Badge was unpleasant, but it was through my local council, so it wasn’t as bad as dealing with the DWP. Stuff like this is always disheartening though, when I have to defend my need for support as a chronically ill/disabled person, I feel as though I have been reduced to a list of symptoms on a form and how they affect me, it’s never a pleasant experience.

New Neurologist

I had a really positive appointment with a new neurologist. He was surprisingly, although I still say this cautiously, helpful. He seemed sensitive in regards to ME, no eye rolling, no disparaging remarks, no (obvious) disbelief. He acknowledged that a lot of my symptoms are neurological, and are indicative of both ME and/or MS. Next step, an MRI of my brain and spinal cord. I’m pleased that he wants an MRI of my spinal cord. Since I read about a small study regarding the improvement of severe ME symptoms following surgical treatment of cervical spinal stenosis, I’ve been wondering if this could be an issue for me, the MRI will let me know. It will also be really interesting to find out if I do have inflammation of my brain and spinal cord, which would be the ‘Encephalomyelitis’ of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. Although some do disagree about the appropriateness of this name for the illness. The ME Association, for example, prefer Myalgic Encephalopathy, with ‘Encephalopathy’ meaning damage or malfunction of the brain, as opposed to inflammation. Whatever he finds, it’s good to have a proactive Neurologist, who plans to follow up and see me again whatever the outcome of the MRI, he wants to help alleviate my suffering, whatever the cause.

Bladder/Uterus/Period Stuff

*If this stuff grosses you out (but why?!) then maybe skip this bit. This is also your warning that I may be stepping into ‘too much information’ territory, so if you don’t want ‘too much information’, don’t read it!

My bladder symptoms returned with a vengeance in February so I’ve been referred to a new Urologist. I’d put this off as the symptoms had lessened, and Urologists aren’t much fun, they like to do invasive bladder procedures, obviously. This may be way too much information, but, why not (I used to be so private, but now I couldn’t care less). Back when my period was really bad, I bought a menstrual cup in the hope it would handle the heaviness of my period, I also liked the idea for environmental reasons, much better to buy one product that I can use every month for ten years, than multiple products per period that end up in landfill. I found out unfortunately, that for some reason, my bladder does not like having a menstrual cup next door to it. Each time I tried it, my bladder symptoms were exacerbated. So I gave up, until a few months ago. I dug out the menstrual cup, sterilised it, and tried again, and that’s what triggered the return of my bladder symptoms. So, I wonder what the Urologist will make of that. I think my pelvic floor muscle is knackered, it’s the only thing that I can think of that, literally, connects all this stuff. I’ve also developed some other new issues surrounding my period. Not only can I not use a menstrual cup, I now experience pain when using tampons, but my period is far too heavy to not use tampons, pads alone are just useless for me.

I’m wondering if my Endometriosis is back. It was almost two years ago when I had surgery and the Endometriosis was cauterised, but it can grow back, the only way to know though, is with more surgery. If my ME wasn’t such a massive and annoying complication I would ideally like a Hysterectomy. I’ve been asking for one since I was sixteen, I have no need for a uterus as I have known since I was a teenager that I didn’t want to have children. But, given how my ME has reacted to hormonal birth control (permanent relapses both times), there is a risk that a Hysterectomy, and the compulsory Hormone Replacement Therapy, could cause another severe and permanent relapse. There’s just no way of knowing what would happen, and a Hysterectomy is of course irreversible, so it would be a huge gamble. I’m also considering Endometrial Ablation, it sounds a bit scary, permanently disfiguring my uterus, but it could be a good compromise. It would make my period lighter and shorter, or even better, it could eliminate it altogether.

Given these particular sets of symptoms seem to be intertwined somewhat, what I really need is to see a Urologist and a Gynaecologist in the same room at the same time, but for some reason that’s just not possible. Apparently modern medicine believes that human bodies are made up of separate parts that never interact.

Fundraising For ME Research

I’ve had some family and a friend do some fundraising for ME research again this year!

My brother-in-law John is running to raise money for Invest In ME Research! He ran the Stirling marathon on 29th April and will run two half marathons in Edinburgh and Alloa on 27th May and 3rd June. His goal is to raise £2500 and at £1932.40 he doesn’t have far to go! You can make a donation here.

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/john-mcglynn3

My friend Paul walked the Northumberland Coastal Challenge  (26.2 miles) on 7th May to raise money for ME Research UK! His goal was £250 which he exceeded by raising £330! You can still make a donation here.

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/PaulwalkforME

In March my niece Amelia (with help from her mummy/my sister Emma), hosted an afternoon tea on the Mother’s Day weekend to raise money for Invest In ME Research and her gym, Astro Gymnastics. She raised £403.34 in total, so £201.67 for each charity!

My mum, for the second time, donated her birthday, which happens to fall on International ME Awareness Day, to Invest In ME Research! She threw a huge party and asked for donations only, no gifts or cards. She’s still to receive some donations but it looks like she’ll have raised around £1000!

Many thanks to John, Paul, Amelia, Emma, my mum and everyone who donated. Every penny that goes to Invest In ME Research and ME Research UK goes directly into biomedical research, which is the only hope we have to find a cure.

#MEAction 

I’m very happy to announce that I am now officially part of the #MEAction Scotland team!

The MEAction Network, co-founded by Unrest Director Jennifer Brea, is a worldwide ME patient advocacy group fighting for health equality for ME. The focus is on empowering patients to take action to improve the research and treatment situation, through local affiliate groups in countries around the world.

My involvement is with our public Facebook page, currently called Millions Missing Scotland, but we hope to soon change the name to #MEAction Scotland. The purpose of this page is to communicate about ME events, activities and news to our followers, and to provide a platform for sharing information about things happening in Scotland. I’m an administrator for the page and will be/have been posting ME related articles, research and news to the page. Basically, the ME news that I’ve been sharing publicly on my own Facebook page, I will now be sharing on the Millions Missing Scotland (soon to be #MEAction Scotland) Facebook page. I urge anyone who likes to read what I post on my own page, in regards to ME news, please do like and follow our page. We want this page to be Scotland’s hub of ME related news. Everything relevant to our illness; fundraising, petitions, research, etc, will all be shared here.

We also have a closed Facebook group called #MEAction Scotland. The group is a community, to get ME advocates in the same place to share ideas and get people involved in ME advocacy. You need to join the group (by request) to be able to post and read other people’s posts. It’s a great place to share ideas and brainstorm about fundraising events, or anything related to ME advocacy. You don’t have to have ME to join the group, our healthy allies are just as important in our advocacy efforts.

ME Awareness Month and #MillionsMissing

May is International ME Awareness Month, with ME Awareness Day falling on May 12th, which was Florence’s Nightingale’s birthday, who reportedly suffered from ME herself.

We have had a lot of press coverage this month. In particular, in response to the new BBC Newsbeat documentary M.E. and Me (available on BBC iPlayer and YouTube) and also in anticipation of the 100+ #MillionsMissing protests that took place globally on Saturday 12th May.

Press coverage is good, but I’ve actually been really disappointed in a lot of the articles I’ve seen. So many start off well, but the reporter then rounds the story off with incorrect details that they’ve clearly found online, such as ‘the recommended treatments are CBT and GET’, with no word that these are actually dangerous and are not based on evidence. I’ve only seen one article (The Canary – see link below in the News section) correctly identify the main symptom of ME. They almost all say that the main symptom of ME is being extremely tired, or something along those lines, but never the actual main symptom – the abnormal response to exertion. Or they use ‘Chronic Fatigue’ in the headline, but then refer to it as ME in the article. This results in people conflating the neuro-immune illness ME, with the symptom Fatigue, which is exactly what we need to be moving away from.

These articles, even with only one error, don’t do us any good. People who don’t know otherwise will read them and go away believing that we have safe treatment options and that we’re just tired. What if these people are on the review team for the NICE guidelines, or are in any way involved with decision making for the support, funding and treatment of ME? Or what if they’re just normal people who are one day presented with a petition to sign, or a campaign to fund for biomedical research? Well, they’ll look the other way, because as far as they’re concerned, based on those many articles they read, we’re already sorted, we have treatments and we don’t need their help.

I see other people with ME celebrating the press coverage, while seemingly not releasing that most of it is harming us. As long as this continues I don’t see anything changing. So what we need to do is comment on these articles, or contact the reporter directly, and put them right. Be polite, thank the reporter for the article, but inform them of the errors, and how those errors impact on people with ME. Then hopefully they’ll be encouraged to continue writing about us, but with the truth.

I was unable to attend the Edinburgh #MillionsMissing protest. Initially because I had hoped to go my mum’s fundraising party that day, but actually I was unable to attend either, making it a pretty miserable day for me. On the one day of the year that people with ME become that bit less invisible, I felt more invisible than ever.

Thankfully though, I was able to watch the events in Edinburgh as they were streamed live via Facebook! The opening speech was especially moving, and rousing, it made me sob, and it made me angry, as it should, it should make everyone angry. I also really liked this line from a poem read in the second clip (after Stuart Murdoch’s speech, about 26 mins in). “So you think I’m looking well. Thank you. But in return I’ll say. My brain and nervous system, aren’t usually on display.”. I think I’ll keep that for whenever I’m told I’m looking well. 😉

Here are some clips from the event, for those who would like to watch.

In this clip there’s the introductory speech by Gerry Farrell, laying of the final shoes and a crowd photo for the press attending.

In this clip Stuart Murdoch, lead singer of Belle & Sebastian, speaks to the huge crowd (at 17 mins in). Sing in the City Choir perform, and people read stories and poems of their lives with ME. 

In this clip MP Carol Monaghan speaks (at 31 mins in), Sing in the City Choir perform again, and more powerful stories and poems are read by and for people with ME.

In this clip Emma Shorter, co-founder of #MEAction Scotland, speaks (at 15 mins in) and leads a mass lie down in the precinct with shoppers and passers-by seeing hundreds of bodies on the ground. And the band Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing perform.

Many thanks to #MEAction Scotland for organising this incredible event, all the volunteers, an incredible effort by people with ME and our healthy allies. Thank you to all the speakers and performers. Thank you to everyone who attended. And thank you to the wonderful volunteer who live-streamed these clips for those of us unable to be there.

Petition

I often have people ask what they can do to help me. Well, this is it, this is what would help me. Please sign and share this petition. Every signature brings us closer to the goal of effective treatment and care for people with ME in Scotland, and beyond.

We are calling on the Scottish Parliament to urge the Scottish Government to review the level of support for people with ME in Scotland with a view to:

  • Investing in biomedical research and creating a centre of excellence for ME
  • Ensuring healthcare professionals’ training and education materials reflect the latest scientific evidence
  • Providing specialist care for patients and discontinuing the harmful treatments graded exercise therapy (GET) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT).

The deadline is 31st May and we need as many signatures as possible by then. You do not have to be Scottish or living in Scotland to sign!

Please Sign and Share!

http://www.parliament.scot/GettingInvolved/Petitions/PE01690

Watch our video to find out more!

Upcoming Blog Posts

Like I said earlier, I have many partially written blog posts, some of them I began writing over a year ago! Most of what you read here takes me weeks or months to write, I tend to dip in and out as and when I feel motivated and well enough.

If you’re wondering what’s to come, these are the subjects that I’ve been thinking of addressing…

  • A hugely significant reanalysis and evaluation of the discredited PACE Trial was published in March this year and it had an enormous impact. I began a post about this the same day, but have been too unwell to complete it. Soon, I hope.
  • Unsolicited advice, specifically, unsolicited medical advice – it’s the worst.
  • My experience of Ableism. It’s everywhere.
  • Hobbies, what I can and can’t do to occupy my time – how having ME has changed this.
  • How I cope with the isolation that living with severe ME brings – not very well.
  • Surprising things about ME – surprising symptoms and surprising ways in which my symptoms affect me.
  • My experience of ME awareness amongst medical professionals – it’s not good.
  • My experience of claiming disability benefits – it’s really not good.
  • Future employment options. What will I do should I be well enough to work again one day?
  • What chronic illness has done to my friendships – some strengthened, some distanced, some gone.
  • My depression and anxiety, in more depth – I’m honest about my ME, so why not my mental health?
  • The difference between being tired and having ME – lots of differences, they are not the same thing.
  • Hypersensitivity – one of the weirder symptoms I suffer from and it’s possibly the hardest to explain to other people – yes, the rustling sound of that plastic bag actually causes me pain.

Do you have any ideas for future posts? If there is anything you would like me to write about, I make no promises, but I’m happy to receive your suggestions!

 

NEWS

The (Australian) Guardian. To the #MillionsMissing with ME/CFS, something remarkable is happening.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/12/to-the-millionsmissing-with-mecfs-something-remarkable-is-happening?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

The Canary. On Saturday ‘millions’ of ‘missing’ people will reappear for the day.

https://www.thecanary.co/discovery/analysis-discovery/2018/05/09/on-saturday-millions-of-missing-people-will-reappear-for-the-day/

The Scotsman. Belle and Sebastian singer Stuart Murdoch on coping with ME.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/health/interview-belle-and-sebastian-singer-stuart-murdoch-on-coping-with-me-1-4738083

Health Rising. Stanford Exercise Study Shows Different Immune Response in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS)

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/03/05/chronic-fatigue-stanford-exercise-immune-response/

The ME Association. A misunderstood disease wrongly labelled make-believe by some GPs is more devastating to sufferers than multiple sclerosis, a new scientific study has found.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/me-association-press-release-people-with-m-e-measurably-more-disabled-than-people-with-multiple-sclerosis-16-march-2018/

Health Rising. The Cortene Way: New Drug to Be Trialed in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) Soon.

Part Three. https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/03/16/cortene-drug-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs-pt-iii-the-clinical-trial/

The ME Association. Chronic fatigue syndrome possibly explained by lower levels of key thyroid hormones.

http://www.meassociation.org.uk/2018/03/frontiers-press-release-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-possibly-explained-by-lower-levels-of-key-thyroid-hormones-20-march-2018/

BMJ Journals. Markers of non-coeliac wheat sensitivity in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome.

http://gut.bmj.com/content/early/2018/03/17/gutjnl-2018-316133

The New York State Department of Health update their information about ME.

https://health.ny.gov/diseases/conditions/me-cfs/

The Evening Standard. Google Maps becomes more wheelchair friendly with launch of journey-planner tool for disabled people.

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/google-maps-becomes-more-wheelchair-friendly-with-launch-of-new-tool-helping-disabled-people-a3791461.html

The Guardian. New initiative to address ticketing barriers for deaf and disabled fans.

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/apr/09/access-is-everything-deaf-disabled-live-music-events

STV News. Disabled Scots ‘will not face unnecessary medical checks’. New legislation paves the way for the creation of a new benefits regime in Scotland.

https://stv.tv/news/politics/1413084-disabled-scots-will-not-face-unnecessary-medical-checks/