Post Fourteen. ME and Me, By Amelia.

Welcome to my first guest post, written by my very talented niece Amelia, who is twelve years old.

It began a school assignment, ‘A primary seven personal project about a subject of her choice of interest to her’. To my delight and surprise, Amelia chose to do this assignment on the subject of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and how my illness affects her. It’s an impressive piece of work. She did her own research, she chose some really descriptive images, and she makes some very interesting and insightful observations. I admit that when I read her first draft, it had me in tears, in a good way! I am just moved beyond belief that Amelia chose to use this as an opportunity to raise awareness of ME, I’m so proud of her, and I’m a little bit in awe of her to be honest. Again this has made me feel so incredibly lucky to have such supportive people in my life.

Everything else you’ll read below, is by Amelia.

 

ME and Me, by Amelia.

“The good news is, these patients don’t die. The bad news is, these patients don’t die.” Ron Davis – Geneticist

This quote was made by a Californian geneticist whose son suffers from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis.

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, commonly known as ME is a chronic illness which has affected my family since early 2015 when my Auntie Phoebe was first diagnosed.

In this report I am going to first tell what ME is, how it is caused and some of the symptoms of ME. I will write about the very common misconceptions that many people have regarding ME. I will write about how it affects my Auntie Phoebe and how it affects me and my family. I will also write about what is currently being done to help sufferers and how we can help people who are affected by this horrible illness.

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis

What is it?

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, also know as ME, is a terrible illness that affects hundreds of thousands of people across the UK and millions worldwide.

It is a neurological illness, which means that there is something physically wrong with the nervous system. It is also a chronic illness, which means it is life long and there is currently no cure. It affects many body systems like the nervous system, which is the network of nerve cells that communicates with the brain, and immune system, which fights germs and diseases.

Many ME sufferers have severe, persistent fatigue. Fatigue is another way of describing extreme tiredness.

Not everyone who has ME will have the same symptoms so it is impossible to compare them to one another. Two people might get ME at the same time from the same probable cause but one could recover in a few years and the other could have it for the rest of their life. That’s one of the reasons why it’s a very hard illness to understand.

img_0762Symptoms of ME

· Post-exertional malaise. This is the extreme exhaustion felt after any physical or mental activity, such as a phone conversation, filling out a form, taking out the bins or making tea, or the worsening of all symptoms.

· Gastro-intestinal problems. These are problems with the stomach, gut and intestines.

· Cognitive dysfunction. This is also known as brain fog. When you have brain fog, you are unable to remember, reason, concentrate and think.

· Headaches

· Sleep problems

· Muscle weakness

· Intense pain all over the body

· Depression, as ME limits human interaction so much so it is easy to become depressed.

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These are only a few of the many symptoms. Every ME sufferer experiences different symptoms at different times.

Causes

The exact causes of ME are unknown, but there are many theories of what they could be. Here are some of them.

· A viral or bacterial infection that damages your immune system

· Your genes

· A hormonal imbalance

· Immune system problems

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What can be done?

The NHS have created a treatment plan for ME sufferers that is meant to relieve their symptoms. Many ME specialists disagree strongly with these methods as they have been proven to cause harm to patients. The plan consists of daily exercise, like swimming and walking. ME sufferers are sometimes unable to stand up, how could exercise help them?

It would tire them out so quickly, they would have to interact with others and the payback the next day would be horrific. These plans could worsen patients significantly.

There is no cure for ME. Invest in ME, which is a research charity trying to find a cure for ME, is hopeful that one day there will be a cure. Current treatment can only treat the symptoms, not cure the illness.

img_0765Common Misconceptions of ME

ME is a very misunderstood illness that people don’t take seriously. It is commonly called “yuppie flu”, which is offensive in so many ways to ME sufferers and their families. In the 1980s, it was dismissed as yuppie flu or shirker syndrome. People said that if they went out for some fresh air or even go see a therapist, that they would feel better. Some people said they were faking it or some put it off as being a bit tired. Due to modern research, these horrible remarks and rumours have been proved wrong but there are many people out there whose belief of ME needs to be put straight. The more people that are told the truth about ME, the better.

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My Experience of ME

My Auntie Phoebe was diagnosed with ME in early 2015.

Before she was diagnosed, she was a shift coordinator working at a food depot run by a homelessness charity. She was in charge of recruiting, training and supervising volunteer workers and helped manage the depot. She organised pick ups and deliveries of food to many charities working with homeless and vulnerable people in Edinburgh. She loved being in such an important position and giving people a chance to get back on to their feet. She also loved driving a forklift truck!

A few months before she become ill, in May 2014, Phoebe was offered her dream job, working at the Penguin Post Office in Port Lockroy, Antarctica. In summer 2014, she started to feel ill and went to several doctors and consultants before being officially diagnosed with ME. Heartbroken, Phoebe had to withdraw from this amazing opportunity. She has been practically house bound since then. Just over a year ago, she had to move from Edinburgh to Peebles to be nearer my Grannie. She had to stop working in 2014 and now lives on (very few) benefits and her savings.

One of the things that Auntie Phoebe does to help her come to terms with her illness is to write a blog called puffins&penguins&me about her experience of ME. It is beautifully written and very informative.

She also encourages her friends and family to hold fundraising events. Last March, the day before Mother’s Day, my mum and I held a fundraiser for Invest in ME. We organised a mother and daughter afternoon tea in the Scout Hut in Currie. We advertised on Facebook and sold etickets. We made many different kinds of cake and sandwiches, served tea and coffee, borrowed massage tables and set up a nail bar so mothers could get pampered by their daughters. We also asked local businesses for raffle prizes and sold tickets. We made £651 and we gave half to Invest in ME and the other half to my gymnastics club.

It was my Grannie’s birthday a few weeks ago, which happened to be on National ME day on 12th May. She threw a party wanting only donations for Invest in ME. She made over £1000!

One of the most difficult things about ME is that sufferers do not look ill. Phoebe went to Grannie’s party and looked beautiful. She managed to stay out for nearly 3 hours, which is the most socialising she has done in years. What people don’t see is the suffering she had the next day.

This is an excerpt from her blog.

“Today I woke up with the worst ‘hangover’ of my life. That’s the best way to describe it. Before you say anything…I only drank water last night, I can’t drink alcohol since I’ve had ME. It took me over two hours after waking up this morning to be able to move and get out of bed, despite desperately needing to pee. I had to crawl to the bathroom, and then back to bed to rest from the overexertion of going to the bathroom. I wanted to brush my teeth but I couldn’t hold my arm up. After another hour of lying down I was able to come upstairs to prepare coffee and something to eat. My head is absolutely pounding, my sinuses are throbbing, my throat hurts, my limbs are heavy, my muscles are aching, there’s an imaginary elephant sitting on each of my shoulders weighing me down, my skin is sore, I’m nauseous, my tonsil wounds are hurting again, it hurts to swallow, I feel faint and dizzy, I’m weak, I feel like I have a temperature (ok, I just checked it and I do have a temperature) and my brain is absolute mush.”

Before she got ME, I would see my auntie all the time, have days out, sleepovers and holidays together. Now Phoebe is so affected by this horrific illness that I rarely see her. Often we arrange to meet her but then she is so ill that we can’t even pop in to say hello or give her a coffee. I love her so much and I would see her everyday if I could.

A Typical Day

These are Phoebe’s words but I have changed them a bit.

  • 10pm – 1am – Falling asleep – this never happens easily and often takes hours.
  • 1am – 11am – Broken sleep, often with hours of wakefulness. A symptom of ME is insomnia.
  • 11am – 2pm – I try to wake up and get up. This can often take hours. When I wake I feel paralysed. I wash my face and brush my teeth and check emails. I can no longer shower every morning.
  • 2pm – I go upstairs and make breakfast. I am completely vegan and eat nothing processed.
  • For the next few hours – I lie on the sofa, sometimes watch tv. I can’t read a book as I can’t focus for long enough. I have to close my eyes for 5 minutes every half hour to regain some energy but I never nap. I slowly prepare dinner, having a rest every few minutes. A 20 minute meal takes over 3 hours to prepare. Sometimes my mum comes in to visit me, she does my dishes and takes out the bins. I listen to music. I suffer from pain every day. I also have sensory overload so I wear noise cancelling headphones and only take them off when I have a visitor. I leave the house every Wednesday for an appointment with my counsellor and rarely leave the house apart from this.
  • Late evening – I go to bed and it all starts all over again.

What you can do to help

I am not going to tell you to become a neurological scientist to help ME sufferers. There is one very simple thing that you can do to help. TELL PEOPLE! All you need to do is tell others about this illness. It doesn’t matter who it is, your mum, dad, grannie, grandpa, uncles, cousins, friends, as long as you are telling someone. Tell them to tell others too! I know it sounds like a movie plot but seriously, just spreading the word can help. So, please help brighten the future of ME and tell everyone you know about this horrible illness.

On Friday 12th May, there was a demonstration outside the Scottish Parliament, trying to persuade SMPs to spend more time understanding this illness. This movement is called #millionsmissing meaning that millions of people are missing out on their lives. It was symbolised outside Parliament by pairs of shoes that never go outside. Here are Auntie Phoebe’s work boots on her forklift truck.

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I know it won’t happen overnight but I really hope that one day, science will have found a cure for ME.

Glossary

Myalgic Encephalomyelitis – A medical condition characterised by long-term fatigue, pain and other symptoms that limit a persons ability to carry out ordinary activities.

Neurological – relating to the anatomy, functions and disorders of the nerves and nervous system.

Post-exertional malaise – The exhaustion felt after any activity and worsening of all symptoms.

Cognitive disfunction – also known as brain fog which means you can’t think clearly.

#millionsmissing – the movement of ME sufferers and supporters to make ME a more understood illness.

Post Thirteen. My Mum’s Birthday/Fundraising Party for Invest in ME.

My mum shares her birthday with ME Awareness Day and last night she held a birthday/fundraising party for Invest In ME. Instead of presents and/or cards she asked for only donations. She still has a few promises of donations to come, but it’s looking like she will have raised over £1000 in total! Incredible!

I attended the party and I don’t know how I did it but I managed to stay for three hours and had multiple conversations with my mum’s friends, mainly answering questions about how ME affects me. It was a lovely evening and a welcome distraction from the terrible week I’ve had.

I knew it was more than I could safely manage. Throughout the evening I knew I should escape to a quiet room to lie down for a rest, but I really didn’t want to drag myself away from the party. I miss out on so much already, I couldn’t bear to miss out on the fun going on around me. So I unadvisedly pushed through.

Today I woke up with the worst ‘hangover’ of my life. That’s the best way to describe it. Before you say anything…I only drank water last night, I can’t drink alcohol since I’ve had ME. It took me over two hours after waking up this morning to be able to move and get out of bed, despite desperately needing to pee. I had to crawl to the bathroom, and then back to bed to rest from the overexertion of going to the bathroom. I wanted to brush my teeth but I couldn’t hold my arm up. After another hour of lying down I was able to come upstairs to prepare coffee and something to eat. My head is absolutely pounding, my sinuses are throbbing, my throat hurts, my limbs are heavy, my muscles are aching, there’s an imaginary elephant sitting on each of my shoulders weighing me down, my skin is sore, I’m nauseous, my tonsil wounds are hurting again, it hurts to swallow, I feel faint and dizzy, I’m weak, I feel like I have a temperature (ok, I just checked it and I do have a temperature) and my brain is absolute mush. I remember feeling like this in the past, but it was easier to cope with when it was self-inflicted through an excess of fun and alcohol. All it took on this occasion was three hours of pleasant conversation the evening before.

This was the first party I’ve attended since 2014, and the first situation I’ve put myself into that I knew would involve constant interaction and conversation with people. I knew it was a risk. This is the worst payback I’ve experienced for quite a while. It’s made me realise that up until last night, I’ve actually been fairly good at pacing and managing my activity to avoid PEM (post exertional malaise). I hope in one evening I haven’t undone any progress I may have made so far. When this bout of payback is over will I go back to how I was doing pre-party? Or is this the beginning of a new phase in my illness? I have no idea. But this is something I have to think about with every single decision I make. I have to weigh up the pros and cons of everything I do. Will the boost to my mental and emotional health outweigh the potential negative and possible long lasting impact on my physical health? I don’t know. It’s impossible to know. I go into everything I do blindly.

While I’m punishing myself for my stupidity and desire to be ‘normal’ for an evening, I can at least take comfort in the fact that the charity, Invest In ME, who campaign for biomedical research into ME, will soon have over £1000 to invest into ME research. This is on top of the money raised by my friends and family in the past few weeks. I have great people in my life who are going out of their way to raise awareness of ME and who are raising money for much needed research.

I’m also quite sure that after this bout of payback fades, that I’ll only have fond memories of a lovely evening. My mum still lives in the house I grew up in, it’s a wonderful and beautiful Victorian house full of lovely memories. It was really lovely last night to see the house and garden so alive with people, chatter and music. The children played on the garden wall and surrounding trees, my niece waited on the guests in style with her bow-tie and flowery Dr Martens. The food was excellent, the wine was flowing (not in my direction obviously) and the live music was a lovely touch. And above all I’m so touched by the incredible generosity of my mum’s friends who donated their time and money, and my wonderful mum, who donated her birthday to help find a cure for ME.

Post Twelve. How You Can Help.

People often ask me what they can do to help me, which is lovely. Within the texts and the emails I receive from my friends I often see ‘I wish I could do something to help you’, or a variation of the same sentiment. Generally speaking, I don’t expect help, no one has any duty nor obligation to help me or make my life easier. But, I have to admit to the fact that I can no longer do everything myself, I do need help. I need to accept help, and what is harder, I need to ask for help.

I’ve known this for a while, but what really brought it home was my recent experience while in week two of my tonsillectomy convalescence. There were a few days when my mum was very ill with a cold, she had a temperature and really had to stay at home and rest. She wasn’t able to do the things she normally does for me, she was just too unwell. For four days I was alone, with ME, post-surgery and with a cold too. I was running out of things that I needed but I couldn’t go to the shops, I can’t even do that on a normal ME day. I felt incredibly lonely, and the isolation made me feel very low in mood. I couldn’t bring myself to reach out and ask anyone to pop by for a visit or to go to the shops for me. I need to be able to ask for help. I really don’t know if my inability, apprehension, discomfort and/or fear of doing so is a normal chronic illness thing, or a Phoebe specific thing. Anyone?

Now, I had already planned a blog post about how my friends and family can help me in terms of raising awareness and fundraising etc, and I’ve decided to expand on that. So this post is to let you know what you can do to help me, should you wish to. There is no pressure and there are no expectations on my part. I’m being very honest and upfront about the variety of ways in which people can help me. But I know people are busy, people have families, and jobs, and worries and stresses of their own, and my needs shouldn’t come before your own. I will however be asking something of you, it’s a big deal, and it isn’t easy for me. But I have to, it’s probably the next step before I one day, maybe, need to hire a carer.

The ways in which you can help me basically boil down to the following…practical support, emotional support, raising awareness/campaigning, and fundraising.

Practical Support

Most of my practical support comes from my mum. She empties my bins, she washes my dishes, she changes my bedding, at the moment she does my cleaning because I’m currently without a paid cleaner, she does my shopping, she washes my hair when I’m too weak and she drives me to appointments. When my mum has been on holiday I have a friend who has stepped in and done some of these things for me, but she really had to push me to accept that she wanted to do these things. Obviously to be able to offer me this kind of practical support you need to live locally, I have friends and family far and wide who I know would help me with the practical stuff if only they lived closer.

My recent experience of suddenly being without my mum for a few days made me realise that I need to put something into place, should this happen again. What I need, I think, is a pool of people who would be happy to be on stand-by for situations like these. Someone who I can text asking if they could fill my prescription, or go to the shops, or put my wheelie bin out etc. But for me to be able to ask this of someone, I need to know, explicitly, that they are happy to do so. A vague offer of ‘let me know if I can do anything for you’, will never result in me asking you to do something for me. Maybe that’s a bit twisted, maybe it’s really weird of me, but that’s how I need it to be. The ‘let me know if I can do anything to help’ offers are kind, but I just don’t know, under such vague terms, what would be too much for me to ask. I think that’s the crux of the matter.

So, if anyone, who lives locally, who I know personally, would be happy to receive a text from me, should I need assistance with something, please let me know. It’s very likely you will at some point receive baked goods in return.

Emotional Support

While my geographically far away friends and family can’t help with my chores they can, and they do, keep my spirits up by keeping in touch via email. I have a few friends and family with whom I keep in regular contact using email, Facebook messenger or text. They check in regularly, they send recipes, articles or music that they think will interest me, and they simply keep in touch, just like they did before I was ill, or more so. I think many understand just how much more I need that, now that I’m so isolated and withdrawn from ‘real life’. Importantly they also understand that there might be a delay of a few days, or weeks, before I can reply, there’s no pressure for me to push myself to reply when I don’t have the energy or strength. I also have a few lovely friends who frequently send me incredibly thoughtful gifts, cards and letters through the post. This is seriously going above and beyond, but it’s always extremely appreciated. It’s a cliché what people say, that during the hard times you learn who your friends are, but it’s true. It really can bring out the best in people, and there’s the opposite, but let’s not dwell on that. At the moment I want to celebrate those who have helped me through this, because I couldn’t do it without them.

What also keeps me going is receiving visitors, this is what I live for. I like catching up with friends in person and chatting over coffee and cake as much as I ever did. Unfortunately with my circumstances being what they are, I have to limit how frequently I can see people and I have to put a time limit on each visit. Scheduling visits can be tricky, and despite my empty life, my calendar fills up remarkably quickly. To help you understand…to avoid PEM (post exertional malaise) I need to rest between activities, so I make it a rule not to schedule activities on consecutive days. Activities can include GP appointments, hospital appointments, Sainsbury’s deliveries, a friend visiting, going for a drive with my mum or counselling appointments etc. So lets say my friend who I maybe only see once or twice a year wants to visit but she can only do weekdays. Well, I have counselling every Wednesday so Wednesday’s are out, I need my rest day before and after counselling so that means Tuesday’s and Thursday’s are out. So we’re left with Monday’s and Friday’s. But if I already have plans for that Saturday then Friday is out, or if I have strayed from my plan and have a GP apt on the Tuesday (because it’s all she had available) then Monday is definitely out. I also try to stick to only one additional activity per week, on top of counselling. More than two activities per week is really pushing it for me, and from past experience I’ve learned it is extremely unwise, no matter how much I want to. Do you see why, despite my empty life, it can become tricky to schedule in a visit? It’s not because I’m living a full and exciting life, it’s because I have to plan everything, meticulously, around my illness and what is best for my health. I am learning, for the first time, how to put myself first, and it doesn’t come naturally to me. I understand that my lack availability might be off putting for you, I might come across as flighty, or like I don’t really want to see you, or like I’m making excuses, but I promise you, I want to see you. We both need to accept that it just might be a few weeks or months away, and that’s ok, it gives me something to look forward to, and I like that.

Raising Awareness and Campaigning

Raising awareness is incredibly important, because no one is going to fund research for an illness they are not aware of. Some people may think they are aware of ME, but the amount of misinformation out there is staggering.

What I want, is for ME to have the same impact as any other serious and life-altering illness/disease/condition. I hate that the world of chronic/serious illness is seemingly divided into cancer and not-cancer, but people ‘get’ cancer, they understand the seriousness of cancer. When you hear that someone has been diagnosed with cancer, you immediately feel the full impact of the horror of that disease. When you hear that someone has been diagnosed with ME, you possibly think they are just a bit tired, that a bit of rest will cure them, that it’s all in their head, that they just need to exercise, that they need to change their diet, that they’re lazy, or you might make a joke about yuppie flu. I’ve heard all of these. What I want is for people to understand the horror of ME. I want people, when hearing that someone they know has been diagnosed with ME, to ‘get’ it. I don’t expect non-sufferers to understand the intricacies of having ME, just like I don’t know the intricacies of having cancer, I’ve never experienced it, but I get the gist. I know that it destroys lives, it can tear families apart and it desperately needs a cure. So does ME; and people, our government, our health care workers, they all need to know that. Understanding would go such a long way in achieving the health equality that we, the 17 million people with ME, deserve.

This is probably the easiest thing I could ask of anyone. If you have a Facebook or Twitter account you can easily spread awareness by sharing any ME articles, or blogs I post. You can sign and share the petitions I share. You can follow the ME pages that I follow. Just by liking what I post on Facebook it will show up on your friends newsfeeds. You can also share my own blog. There’s bound to be at least one of your Facebook friends who thinks that ME is nothing more than ‘being a bit tired’. If sharing articles or my blog posts on your newsfeed can put that one person right, then that’s a job well done, the next time they hear a ‘yuppie flu’ joke they can put that person right. This is how you spread awareness, people power! Spreading awareness is one of the biggest and most meaningful things you can do for me, besides you know, finding a cure.

ME Awareness Month

You may or may not be aware but May is ME Awareness month. I can’t mention everything that is happening this month, this post is already pretty long, but I want to bring the #MillionsMissing movement to your attention.

#MillionsMissing is a movement to raise awareness for ME, which as you know is an underfunded and ignored illness. On May 12th 2017, ME Awareness Day, thirteen cities in nine countries will demand change. We ask for increased government funding for research, clinical trials, medical education and public awareness. I’m delighted to tell you that there will be a protest event in Edinburgh this year. This will be on Friday 12th May 2017 from 12:00 PM to 14:00 PM outside the Scottish Parliament Building. People with ME, their friends, families and carers will be there, and maybe a MSP or two. But there will also be lots of empty pairs of shoes with tags attached, these will be representing the #MillionsMissing. The millions of people with ME who are missing from their jobs, their families, their communities, their lives. Please join in if you can, and tell people, or if you pass the protest and can’t stop, take a quick photo and share on social media, with the #MillionsMissing hashtag. Click on the #MillionsMissing link above and scroll down to the blue section to find your closest protest.

Unrest

I’d also like you to look out for the documentary film, Unrest. Director Jennifer Brea was a journalist and academic studying for a PhD at Harvard. Months before her wedding, she became progressively ill, losing the ability to even sit in a wheelchair. When told by her doctor it was “all in her head,” her response was to start filming from her bed, gradually deploying crews globally to document the world inhabited by millions of patients that medicine forgot. I’m in communication with the Edinburgh Filmhouse to have the film screened there on it’s general release in the autumn, but it will be screened at various film festivals before then. You can also watch Jennifer Brea’s poignant TED talk ‘What happens when you have a disease doctors can’t diagnose’, here.

Please visit my About page to see which additional charities/movements I’d encourage you to follow on social media.

Fundraising

ME is a vastly underfunded illness, especially when based on the impact to the life of a person with ME, when compared to other illness. I couldn’t find relevant information for the UK, but, here is an article estimating the disease burden of ME in the United States and its relation to research funding. It’s pretty grim reading.

Donating money is an easy concept, for those with the financial ability to do so. Fairly recently, I think it was after I wrote Post Nine, a few people got in touch and asked me what my preferred ME charities were, in terms of donating money. If you feel that you would like to make a donation, these are my preferences…

Invest In ME

Invest in ME was formed in 2005 by patients and carers of children with ME. It is run by a small team of dedicated volunteers, the charity has no paid staff and keeps all costs to a minimum. They campaign and fundraise for biomedical research into ME. They really do so much, it would be a whole blog post to do them justice, please check out their website for more information. Invest In ME are my first choice, in terms of monetary donations.

Edinburgh ME Self-Help Group

Founded over 20 years ago, Edinburgh M.E. Self-Help Group (edmesh) is a support group for people with ME. They are a membership organisation run by a committee of volunteers and have no paid staff. Most of the committee have ME themselves.

#MEAction

#MEAction is an international network of patients empowering each other to fight for health equality for ME. It is not structured like a traditional advocacy organisation. They are a platform designed to empower patient advocates and organisations, wherever they might be, with the technological tools and training to do what they are already doing –better. They were founded with the belief that while we may find it difficult to advocate for ourselves in the physical world, in the virtual world, we can be an unstoppable force. This is exactly what I plan do to with the rest of my life, even if I get better, I’ll never stop advocating for people with ME.

Now for anyone who would like to challenge themselves whilst raising money for a ME charity you might be interested in…

Walk for ME

Friends and family of a ME sufferer do a sponsored walk, run or swim on their behalf, hence the name Walk for ME. The aim is to get as many friends and loved ones as possible to do a sponsored walk or other sponsored event during ME Awareness month in May, although it can be held in any other month. Walk for ME supports Invest in ME and ME Research UK. Both of which fund biomedical research and therefore offer the potential to help millions of people get their lives back. The whole idea is that a friend or family member is doing something that their loved one would love to be able to do but can’t because of their illness.

Something a bit easier…

Use the Easyfundraising website to collect free donations by shopping online. First you select your charity of choice on the easyfundraising website, I chose Invest In ME. To raise money, instead of going directly to the retailer website, log into easyfundraising first and click on the retailer you want to shop with. You’ll then be taken to the retailer’s website where you shop as you would normally. But because you visited easyfundraising first, your cause gets a donation.

Thank you!

Now I have some public thank you’s to give.

My friend Jo recently completed a 5k swimathon for Invest In ME, Marie Curie Cancer Care and the Swimathon Foundation. It’s not too late to sponsor her! Here’s a post-swim message from Jo…

“With your help, I’ve raised £235 online for Invest In ME so far. I completed the swim (all 200 lengths) last night in 1 hour 50 something – I was too tired at the end to pay attention to the time I was told. It’s my slowest time but considering how little training I did it wasn’t bad! I was 2nd in my pool last night out of 6 people doing the full 5km so I’ll just remember that fact! I lost count at 28 lengths, kept going for a good long time and had a break at 112 (I asked my counter), then sped up to 150, another few sips of squash and then to the end. A hat and goggles that were too tight combined with my lack of fitness gave me a killer eye/headache so I’ve been pretty lazy today. Almost feeling back to normal now with just achy shoulders. I know many people, especially my ME suffering friends would be ecstatic with that sort of recovery rate – that’s why I’ve raised this money to go towards researching this horrible disease.”

My friends Gillian and Ritchie are taking part in a 5k inflatable obstacle course, Gung-Ho! this month to raise money for Invest In ME. Please support them by sponsoring them in their bouncy endeavour! In Gillian’s words…

“My dear friend Phoebe has ME and since her diagnosis her life has been drastically altered resulting in her having to give up on most of her life time goals and ambitions. Even day to day life that we all take for granted are a struggle for her. I’m sure if you take the time to read her story you will understand how devastating this illness is.”

My 12yr old niece Amelia, with assistance from her mummy, my sister Emma, held a charity Pamper Afternoon Tea for mothers and daughters on Mother’s Day. They raised £631 which was split between Invest In ME and Amelia’s gym, Astro Gymnastics, which is in need of bigger premises. Amelia wanted to include a ME charity in her fundraiser because…

“I chose to raise money for Invest in ME because it is a charity that is very personal to my whole family. My Auntie Phoebe suffers badly from this condition and is currently unable to work, socialise or have any kind of normal life. So it is the best charity we could raise money for. It affects many people and raising money for Invest In ME could help other people with ME. It also will help raise awareness for ME. It is a very misunderstood illness and more people should know about it. We would love for Invest in ME to find a cure for this terrible illness.”

My mum happens to share her birthday with ME International Awareness Day, and this year she is donating her birthday to Invest In ME! She is holding a fundraising birthday garden party and instead of gifts and cards she is asking for only donations. In preparation she is currently experimenting with methods of keeping vast quantities of baked potatoes hot, and she is having hooks put into the back of the house to attach a tarpaulin, in case of rain. Although, so far in her life it has apparently only ever rained on her birthday twice, so the odds are in our favour.

My friends Chiara and Alex are getting married this summer and instead of gifts they would prefer their guests donate money to a charity, a concept that I love. They have chosen Invest In ME as one of their charities.

I have a few other friends who have floated the idea by of fundraising for Invest in ME, and hope to do something in the future, you know who you are, and thank you to you too.

Lastly, all the people who read my blog, who share it, who visit me, who help me with the boring practical stuff, who read the ME articles I post on Facebook, who sign the petitions I share, who keep in contact with me, who send me the articles, recipes and music you think I’ll like, who send me surprises through the post, thank you. x